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    Jolie Rouge's Avatar
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    What's with the Bunny?

    How the Easter Bunny hopped into a holy holiday
    By Rich_Maloof 10 hours ago


    As if religion weren’t confusing enough, here comes a bunny symbolizing the holiest of Christian holidays.

    Not a rabbit, mind you, but a cuddly bunny. And apparently a bunny that lays eggs, which is weird for a mammal. We could understand an Easter lamb. Even a possum, with its famed wait-I’m-not-really-dead trick, would have a better claim on the story of the resurrection.

    When asked by an inquisitive youngster why there’s a bunny on Easter, parents have a better answer for why a fat man with magic reindeer flies around the world on Christmas, violating the civil laws of countless municipalities by breaking and entering millions of homes. For those adults stuttering over a reply, here’s the abridged origin of the Easter bunny, which is guaranteed to hold the interest of no child, let alone a kid amped up on jelly beans and chocolate.

    The Easter bunny first hopped into the holiday back in the 16th century, when German folk legends told of a springtime rabbit delivering eggs to well-behaved children. In 1680, a writer named Georg Franck von Franckenau, whose name is kind of fun to say, was the first to formally publish the legend in a story about a rabbit who laid eggs and hid them in a garden. The tale made its way stateside when Germans emigrated to Pennsylvania Dutch country in the 1700s.

    Eggs have symbolized birth and the renewal of life throughout antiquity, but the rabbit in German folklore was borrowed from ancient pagan myths surrounding springtime. On the vernal equinox, feasts were held in honor of the spring goddess known to Saxons as Eostre (known to others as Ostre or Eastre). Her symbol was the rabbit or hare, which embodied the spirit of rebirth and procreation. Rabbits, of course, are famously fertile and breed like…well, like rabbits. A female hare (a close cousin of the rabbit) is so prolific she can give birth to one brood of bunnies while pregnant with the next. Apparently these critters don’t believe in contraception, which may be the one legitimate connection they have to the church.

    It seems ironic that Christianity adopted symbolism and the word “Easter” from paganism, which is historically disparaged by organized religions. But absorbing the images and practices of polytheistic peasant religions helped make the church more familiar and approachable to potential converts.

    In keeping, the bunnies, chocolate eggs, and candy-filled baskets help ease a child’s introduction to religion. Though difficult to explain, for a time they even spare parents the more delicate task of describing the New Testament’s story of the death and rebirth of Jesus. Easter symbolism may be one part pagan, one part Christian, and one part Cadbury, but we’ll take the chocolate bunny. Dark chocolate, if you please. Dip it in peanut butter and bite its head off. Happy Easter.

    http://living.msn.com/life-inspired/...&OCID_OTD=0406

    Easter was the Celtic Pagan Goddess of spring. An She could tranform herself into a rabbit, which a fertility symbol.

    ..

    In the early Christian Church during the first centuries, the only celebrated 'Feast' Day was 'Resurection Sunday', or as its called today, Easter.

    Easter coincides with Passover in that, it was during the celebration of Passover that Jesus took the unleavened bread, blessed it, broke and distributed it to the 11 Apostles (Judas had already left to do his bidding) saying "Take this all of you and eat it. This Is My Body". Doing likewise with the cup, or chalice, of wine, He told them "Take this and drink, this is My blood, the blood of the new and everlasting covenant, which will be poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins. Do this in memory of Me".

    In Catholicism, we belive that the bread and wine, through transubstantiation,

    become the actual Body and Blood of the Lord - just as He had said. Our Protestant brothers and sisters believe it is a symbol His Body and Blood.

    In any case, because we believe that Jesus is the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity, and therefore God, we take Him at His word and Celebrate this most Holy Feast.

    May the Lord Bless you and your families on this Easter Sunday and all through the season of Easter! And, to our Jewish friends, Happy Passover!


    ..

    The easter egg is symbolic of the egg form the amanita mushroom is in at this time of year.With out to much research the average person can find the psycadelic drug basis on most of our man god religions specially christianity which has become a thousand different religions all calling their god jesus.

    ..

    Didn't Southpark Have an episode explaining the origins of the Easter bunny?
    Laissez les bon temps rouler! Going to church doesn't make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.** a 4 day work week & sex slaves ~ I say Tyt for PRESIDENT! Not to be taken internally, literally or seriously ....Suki ebaynni IS THAT BETTER ?

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    The Fishy Tale Behind Eating Fish On Friday
    11:34 am April 6, 2012 by Maria Godoy

    Did the pope really make a secret pact to sell more fish? No, but the real story of eating fish on Fridays is much more fantastical.

    It sounds like the plot of a Dan Brown thriller: A powerful medieval pope makes a secret pact to prop up the fishing industry that ultimately alters global economics. The result: Millions of Catholics around the world end up eating fish on Fridays as part of a religious observance.

    This "realpolitik" explanation of why Catholics eat fish on Friday has circulated for so long, many people grew up believing it as fact. Some, myself included, even learned it in Catholic school. It's a humdinger of a tale — the kind conspiracy theorists can really sink their teeth into. But is it true? "Many people have searched the Vatican archives on this, but they have found nothing," says Brian Fagan, a professor emeritus of archaeology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, whose book, Fish On Friday, explores the impact of this practice on Western culture.

    The real economic story behind fish on Fridays turns out to be much better.

    Let's start with a quick lesson in theology: According to Christian teaching, Jesus died on a Friday, and his death redeemed a sinful world. People have written of fasting on Friday to commemorate this sacrifice as early as the first century. Technically, it's the flesh of warmblooded animals that's off limits — an animal "that, in a sense, sacrificed its life for us, if you will," explains Michael Foley, an associate professor at Baylor University and author of Why Do Catholics Eat Fish On Friday?

    Fish are coldblooded, so they're considered fair game. "If you were inclined to eat a reptile on Friday," Foley tells The Salt, "you could do that, too."

    Alas, Christendom never really developed a hankering for snake. But fish — well, they'd been associated with sacred holidays even in pre-Christian times. And as the number of meatless days piled up on the medieval Christian calendar — not just Fridays but Wednesdays and Saturdays, Advent and Lent, and other holy days — the hunger for fish grew. Indeed, fish fasting days became central to the growth of the global fishing industry. But not because of a pope and his secret pact.

    At first, says Fagan, Christians' religious appetite was largely met with herring, a fish that was plentiful but dry and tasteless when smoked or salted. And preservation was a must in medieval times: There was no good way for fresh fish to reach the devout masses. Eventually, cod became all the rage — it tasted better when cured and it lasted longer, too.

    The Vikings were ace at preserving cod — they "used dried and salted cod as a form of beef jerky on their ocean passages," Fagan says. And the route the Vikings took at the end of the first millennium — Greenland, Iceland, Newfoundland — matches up with the natural range of the Atlantic cod.

    It's possible that others may have followed the cod trail to Canada before Columbus sailed the ocean blue. Clues suggest that English fishermen from Bristol may have made the voyage by around 1480 but kept mum on the location lest the competition rush in. By some accounts, both Columbus and John Cabot had heard of these adventures when they set off on their own epic journeys west.

    "Why do people go over the horizon?" Fagan says. "In the case of the North Atlantic after the Norse ... they went looking for cod" to satiate the demands of the faithful.

    So that's the empire part of our saga. Funny enough, while the pope story is a fish tale, an official leader of a church did make fish fasting the law for purely practical reasons. For that story — and the lust our headline promised — we turn to a monarch known for his carnal cravings: Henry VIII.

    By the time Henry ascended the throne in 1509, fish dominated the menu for a good part of the year. As one 15th century English schoolboy lamented in his notebook: "Though wyll not beleve how werey I am off fysshe, and how moch I desir to that flesch were cum in ageyn."

    But after Henry became smitten with Anne Boleyn, English fish-eating took a nosedive.

    You see, Henry was desperate with desire for Anne — but Anne wanted a wedding ring. The problem was, Henry already had a wife, Catherine of Aragon, and the pope refused to annul that decades' long marriage. So Henry broke off from the Roman Catholic Church, declared himself the head of the Church of England and divorced Catherine so he could marry Anne.

    Suddenly, eating fish became political. Fish was seen as a " 'popish flesh' that lost favour as fast as Anglicism took root," as Kate Colquhoun recounts in her book Taste: The Story of Britain Through Its Cooking.

    Fishermen were hurting. So much so that when Henry's young son, Edward VI, took over in 1547, fast days were reinstated by law — "for worldly and civil policy, to spare flesh, and use fish, for the benefit of the commonwealth, where many be fishers, and use the trade of living."

    In fact, fish fasting remained surprisingly influential in global economics well into the 20th century.

    As one economic analysis noted, U.S. fish prices plummeted soon after Pope Paul VI loosened fasting rules in the 1960s. The Friday meat ban, by the way, still applies to the 40 days of the Lenten fast, which ends this Saturday.

    A few years before the Vatican relaxed the rules, Lou Groen, an enterprising McDonald's franchise owner in a largely Catholic part of Cincinnati, found himself struggling to sell burgers on Fridays. His solution? The Filet-O-Fish.

    While not exactly the miracle of loaves and fishes, Groen's little battered sandwich has fed millions around the world.

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/201...fish-on-friday
    Laissez les bon temps rouler! Going to church doesn't make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.** a 4 day work week & sex slaves ~ I say Tyt for PRESIDENT! Not to be taken internally, literally or seriously ....Suki ebaynni IS THAT BETTER ?

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