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    Dec 17, 2015 4:07 PM CST

    [B]Removal of New Orleans' Confederate monuments could begin in days[/B

    After nearly six months of debate, the New Orleans City Council voted to remove four monuments dedicated to Confederate history in New Orleans.

    The removal of three of the four could begin within days, a press release from Mayor Mitch Landrieu states.

    The four monuments are:
    - A 16-foot-tall bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee looking over St. Charles Avenue since 1884 that stands on top a 60-foot-high Doric marble column.
    - A bronze figure of the Confederate president, Jefferson Davis, that now stands at Canal Street and Jefferson Davis Parkway.
    - Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard, who straddles a prancing horse at the entrance to City Park.
    - An 1891 obelisk honoring the Crescent City White League. An inscription added in 1932 said the Yankees withdrew federal troops and "recognized white supremacy in the South" after the group challenged Louisiana's biracial government after the Civil War. In 1993, these words were covered by a granite slab with a new inscription, saying the obelisk honors "Americans on both sides" who died and that the conflict "should teach us lessons for the future."

    "Private dollars will be used to pay for the removal of these monuments; the estimated cost is approximately $170,000," the release states. "The city will begin the legal process necessary to remove the Liberty Place monument, which is currently subject to a federal court order."

    The City will use a contractor selected through a publicly-procured program that has been in place since 2009 and provides the opportunity to select from several contractors to perform small and emergency projects. Additional details will be announced as they become available.

    Once removed, the monuments will be stored in a City-owned warehouse until further plans can be developed for a park or museum site where the monuments can be put in a fuller context.

    Divergent views on what should happen to the monuments were voiced at a lively, and sometimes disorderly, city council meeting today.

    According to the Associated Press, the Rev. Shawn Anglim, a Methodist pastor, is among clergy who have spoken out in favor of taking down the monuments. Anglim told those gathered at Thursday's meeting to "Do the right thing. Do it for our children, and our children's children."

    Opponents of the removal plan wanted the council to consider alternatives, including erecting other monuments to tell a wider narrative about the Civil War.

    Michael Duplantier told the meeting: "We cannot hit a delete button for the messy parts of our history."

    Others said the council should go further and remove statues and change street names they say are associated with "white supremacy." Activist Malcolm Suber calls the monuments "products of the Jim Crow era, an era when blacks were hunted and persecuted."

    A week ago, the council heard from the public at an hours-long meeting that went into the evening. At the emotional meeting, police escorted some speakers from the council's chambers as heckling and insults were passed back and forth.

    The City Council hoped to avoid a messy public display and limited public comments to one hour today.

    The ordinance called the monuments a nuisance because they foster ideologies that undermine the equal protection clause provided by the Constitution and because they support the idea of racial supremacy.

    The vote followed a contentious council meeting, which was a reflection of a contentious conversation over the past year.

    At one point, Councilwoman Stacy Head asked Mayor Mitch Landrieu how he planned to move forward.

    Landrieu said he envisions a commission of some sort that would be charged with creating a policy, and with creating a historical park that puts these monuments "in the proper context in relationship to the history of the city."

    Landrieu said he picked these four monuments because "these are the ones that matter most to the city now." He said he believes that future mayors and city councils may find other monuments should be addressed.

    Landrieu disputed the claim that he initiated this effort. That discussion began in the 1960s, he said. "One of the things I'm more certain about today than I was when I announced this, is that this is the right thing to do and the right time to do it," he said. "I didn't cause this division, but I am seeking a resolution to it."

    Head attempted to cut off Landrieu's comments about the larger issues, but he responded forcefully.

    "This is the council chambers," she said.

    "And I am the mayor of New Orleans. You will let me answer the question," Landrieu said. "You opened the floor, so i'm going to answer. You started this, we're going to finish. You asked me a question, you have to let me finish."

    Landrieu was allowed to finish his comments.

    Councilman James Gray said he is the grandson of slaves and the great-grandson of slaves, and is insulted by those who have said he's only voting for the ordinance because Landrieu told him to. "I don't need Mitch Landrieu to remind me who I am," Gray said, adding that he is gratified that Landrieu proposed the ordinance.

    Councilwoman Nadine Ramsey said the monuments "exhault" people who tried to destroy the United States. "As a society, we can no longer tolerate living underneath their shadows," Ramsey said.

    This issue didn't cause division in the city, but "have cast a light on issues that have festered for many decades," she added. "I cannot understand why anyone can justify retaining symbols of oppresion that caused real pain," she said. "This is not an attempt to rewrite history. No one is saying they are not who they were or that they did not do what they did."

    http://www.katc.com/story/30777749/n..._s_Newschannel
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  3. #68
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    Lawsuit filed to halt removal of monuments

    Posted: Dec 17, 2015 7:04 PM CST


    NEW ORLEANS, LA (WVUE) -
    After the New Orleans City Council voted in favor of an ordinance to remove four Confederate-era monuments, four organizations filed suit in federal court in to halt those efforts.

    (Read the lawsuit here http://ftpcontent.worldnow.com/wvue/...ntsLawsuit.pdf )

    A statement was released on behalf of the organizations. It reads, in part:

    "The claims asserted by Louisiana Landmarks Society, Foundation for Historical Louisiana, Monumental Task Committee and Beauregard Camp No. 130 challenge virtually every one of the City’s actions, from its failure to comply with federal laws protecting sites on the National Register of Historic Places, to the flawed procedure in which the City Council ignored the requirements of City Code 146-611 and the City’s own protocol for receipt of donations. The specific allegations are included in a twelve count, fifty-one page Complaint; Civil Action number 15-06905."
    http://www.fox8live.com/story/307811...l-of-monuments

    Consider this : the War of Northern Aggression was fought over States Rights. What are we currently in conflict with in regards to the current administration ? A Federal Goverment telling States that they can not control their own boundries or enforce existing laws in regards to immigration, gun control, and more. These monuments have stood for generations and only became "offensive" when this Administration and the Mainstream Media suddenly TOLD everyone that they were.
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    Robert E. Lee Was A Far, Far Better Man Than Mitch Landrieu…

    June 24 2015
     41 Comments


    and therefore it is no particular surprise that New Orleans’ squalid, petty mayor – whose record in governance shows endemic corruption and incompetence so basic that simple things like potholes go untended and violent crime has begun to threaten the very fabric of society – would make it his project to tear down the monument to Lee from the center of the circle which also bears his name.

    Landrieu, the scion of a fading New Orleans political dynasty known mostly for crony capitalism, usurpation of power and self-dealing graft, has seen his stock fade badly in the past year as the strong New Orleans economy he inherited from Ray Nagin has gradually slowed – at the same time that a crime wave of such force as to cause a panic across the Crescent City has gone unchecked by the police force broken by Landrieu’s having brought the Justice Department in to “reform” it.

    Amid the mounting evidence of his failure in office, some effect of which is that Landrieu was once almost openly bragging of his ability to beat David Vitter in the governor’s race this fall and is now long since forgotten as a candidate, the mayor is now attempting to pander to the Democrat base voters in that city by jumping on board the vulgar politically correct train and demanding a removal of the Lee statue in downtown New Orleans.

    Landrieu threw in an apology for slavery along with his cheap histrionics about removing the city’s historical monuments. We weren’t aware that the Landrieu family kept slaves, or that Mitch or his father had permitted slavery in the city.

    Because there had to be more reason for the apology other than white guilt or baseless sucking up to the race industry.

    Landrieu said that taking the Lee statue down would be done in pursuit of “unity,” which is laughable considering who Robert E. Lee actually was.

    Yes, Lee fought for the Confederacy. If that’s all you know of the man you are ignorant of American history and unqualified to make decisions about preserving it. You are on the same level as the barbarian goons from ISIS who destroy monuments and historical artifacts not fitting their 7th-century interpretation of Islam, or the Taliban who obliterate the Buddhist statues at Bamiyan.

    Or, in a slightly more modernist context, the Soviet-era apparatchiks busily airbrushing the images of the personae non grata from official photos during Stalin’s time.

    Robert E. Lee is, for those who aren’t ignorant of the man and his story, a quite unifying figure. Lee could easily have gone out in a blaze of glory, or taken to the wilderness and fight on as a guerrilla insurgent commander piling up bodies and continuing the Civil War to almost endless slaughter. He did none of that, despite having his personal fortune taken away and his post-war prospects limited to penury and shame. He had little personal interest to be served by surrendering at Appomattox Courthouse, but that’s what he did. Why? Because for Lee, continuing the war when it was lost would have been morally wrong. And upon his surrender he pledged himself to reconciliation between North and South.

    Reconciliation. Get it? As in, reunification?

    Here’s a story illustrating that, unlike the cheap words we expect and are delivered from tawdry politicians like Mitch Landrieu, that pledge was backed by integrity, courage and action… http://www.amazon.com/April-1865-Mon.../dp/0060899689

    It was a warm Sunday at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, and an older man, one of the church’s many distinguished communicants, who had spent the last four years in war, was sitting in his customary pew. With his shoulders rounded, his middle thickened, his hair snow-white and beard gray, as usual, he attracted the attention of the rest of the church. But then so did another parishioner.

    As the minister, Dr. Charles Minnergerode, was about to administer Holy Communion, a tall, well-dressed black man sitting at the western galley (which was reserved for Negroes) unexpectedly advanced to the communion table-unexpectedly because his this had never happened here before. Suddenly, the image of Richmond redux was conjured up-a flashback to prewar years. Usually whites received communion first, then blacks-a small but strictly adhered to ritual, repeated so often that to alter it was unthinkable. This one small act, then, was like a large frontier separating two worlds: the first being that of the antebellum South, the second being that of post-Civil War America. The congregation froze; those who had been ready to go forward and kneel at the altar rail remained fixed in their pews. Momentarily stunned, Minnergerode himself was clearly embarrassed. The horror-and surprise-of the congregation were no doubt largely visceral, but Minnergerode’s silent retreat was evident. It was one thing for the white South to endure defeat and poverty, or to accept the fact that slaves were now free; it was quite another for a black man to stride up to the front of the church as though an equal. And not just at any church, but here, at the sanctuary for Richmond’s elite, the wealthy, the well-bred, the high-cultured.

    The black man slowly lowered his body, kneeling, while the rest of the congregation tensed in their pews. For his part, the minister stood, clearly uncomfortable and still dumbfounded. After what seemed to be an interminable amount of time-although it was probably only seconds-the white man arose (Lee), his gait erect, head up and eyes proud, and walked quietly up the aisle to the chancel rail. His face was a portrait of exhaustion, and he looked far older than most people had remembered from when the war had just begun. These days had been hard on him. Recently, in a rare, unguarded moment he had uncharacteristically blurted out, “I’m homeless-I have nothing on earth.”

    Yet these Richmonders, like all of the South, still looked to him for a sense of purpose and guidance. No less so now as, with quiet dignity and self-possession, he knelt down to partake of the communion, along with the same rail with the black man.

    Watching Robert E. Lee, the other communicants slowly followed in his path, going forward to the altar, and, with a mixture of reluctance and fear, hope and awkward expectation, into the future.
    Lee’s sterling reputation among his contemporaries came from selflessness. For example, while commander of the Army of Northern Virginia he freed his family’s slaves at great cost to his personal fortune; to do so left him largely penniless. The war cost him his family’s lands as well; what is now Arlington National Cemetery was actually Lee’s estate and in what was seen as a grave insult the federal government decreed it would be a graveyard for the Union’s dead. He made no complaint about that decision, and quietly accepted a position as president of Washington College, which is now known as Washington & Lee University, in order to help mold the next generation of Southerners to be good American citizens.

    As to slavery, Lee despised it, and openly so. He shocked many in the Southern upper class when he said…

    So far from engaging in a war to perpetuate slavery, I am rejoiced that Slavery is abolished. I believe it will be greatly for the interest of the South. So fully am I satisfied of this that I would have cheerfully lost all that I have lost by the war, and have suffered all that I have suffered to have this object attained.
    This was a great man who chose to fight for a doomed, and damned, cause. His choice was not an enthusiastic one. He was not a great believer in the Confederate cause, but he could not bring himself to fight against his family, neighbors and friends…

    With all my devotion to the Union and the feeling of loyalty and duty of an American citizen, I have not been able to make up my mind to raise my hand against my relatives, my children, my home. I have therefore resigned my commission in the Army, and save in defense of my native State, with the sincere hope that my poor services may never be needed, I hope I may never be called on to draw my sword…
    This after Lee was offered the position of supreme commander of the Union Army by President Lincoln, which for his personal purposes would have been a far more plum assignment than that of a startup, undersupplied rebel army defending a quickly beleaguered fledgling nation.

    Lee acted against his personal interests out of a sense of duty and honor. When has Mitch Landrieu, who builds streetcar lines and gets tax breaks for real estate developers, so as to benefit his own bank-book, ever done the same?

    America, and New Orleans, is in the deplorable shape it is currently in because our modern society produces Mitch Landrieus when we desperately need Robert E. Lees. No wonder the memories of great men are brought low by the petty hacks from whom we are forced to choose as our leaders.


    http://thehayride.com/2015/06/robert...itch-landrieu/
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    Let me make this clear to you Mitch Landrieu...

    This is a dangerous precedent. Robert E. Lee's statue is there because he is an American soldier. He fought for the United States before the civil war and worked towards reconciliation between north and south after the civil war. He had a note worthy military career and fought for freed slaves to have public schools. His former home is the resting place for thousands of our military. He was president of a college that still stands today. He has been on United States postage several times. Not just the south honors him. He also was well known and liked in the north. If the United States, our country, has no issue with him, why should you??!!

    If we start taking down symbols of our military veterans just because not everyone agrees with a war they fought in, where does it end? Millions didn't agree with the reasons behind Vietnam, but we still appreciate and celebrate our vets. We don't disregard their efforts or sacrifices. No one is taking down any Vietnam memorials! We wouldn't dream of it!

    That statue has been a part of our great city since 1884 and if you think that tearing it down at the expense of the tax payers will make all of the race relations miraculously better, you are an idiot.
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    Meet The Well-Connected, Powerful Elites Who Are Destroying New Orleans
    John Binder - December 21, 2015



    To residents of New Orleans and the state, Mayor Mitch Landrieu is responsible for the purging of history which will soon take place in the Big Easy, just as the New Orleans City Council approved Landrieu’s plan last week to remove four historical monuments.

    Landrieu, though, acts more as a prop it seems when it comes to removing all symbols related to the South and the Confederacy.

    During the vote to remove the monuments, New Orleans City Councilwoman Latoya Cantrell said the movement to remove monuments did not come from the ground up, rather it came directly from Landrieu’s office. The monuments were pre-picked by Landrieu and it entirely unclear how the mayor actually chose which monuments should go.

    Sources close to the Hayride say Landrieu’s call for monuments to be removed was not simply a reaction to the Charleston AME Church shooting, but rather a well-planned and well-organized demand.

    Back in June, when Landrieu called for the monuments to be removed, immediately following was a protest rally at Robert E. Lee Circle where protesters burned the Confederate flag.

    Coincidentally, members of the Trilateral Commission of New Orleans, which is made up of multiple social justice advocacy groups, spoke at the flag-burning rally.

    Besides the NAACP, one of the groups involved with the Trilateral Commission of New Orleans and the protest was the National Action Network, which was founded in 1991 Rev. Al Sharpton, the notorious race-baiting liberal.

    Sharpton has become known for perpetually running to the scenes of racial tensions across the country and drumming up controversy among local residents.

    Of course, this probably sounds familiar, because in true Sharpton spirit, that is exactly what occurred in New Orleans following Landrieu’s monument removal demand.

    Sharpton’s National Action Network, however, is certainly not the only national, elite organization involved in Landrieu’s monument removal.

    The global bastion-of-liberal-thought organization, the Trilateral Commission, has been wildly pushing the narrative that New Orleans must remove monuments to shed its racist history. (The Trilateral Commission of New Orleans seems to be a smaller sect of the global Trilateral Commission.)

    Aspen Institute President Walter Isaacson is a member of the Trilateral Commission. Oddly enough, so is New York Times writer David Brooks.

    And oddly enough, both Isaacson and Brooks wrote pieces explaining why it was extremely important for monuments to be removed in New Orleans. Isaacson actually wrote a few pieces, which the Times Picayune and New Orleans Advocate published.

    Brooks’ piece on New Orleans monuments appeared in the New York Times shortly after Landrieu’s call for monument removal.

    Brooks and Isaacson’s pro-monument removal op-ed pieces ran on the same exact day in the New York Times and the Times Picayune.

    Isaacson also has very close ties to Landrieu. The former Time magazine editor was hand-picked by Landrieu to serve on the city’s Tricentennial Committee.

    Most recently, Landrieu said he wanted to create a commission dedicated to reviewing all historical monuments and street names in the city based on criteria established by Brooks and Isaacson. It is unclear what that criteria entails, but it is telling that he is pulling directly from Brooks and Isaacson’s playbook.

    Why would Landrieu be following a “pathway” for monument removal outlined by Brooks and Isaacson if this issue came from the grassroots like Democrats have continued to claim in the debate?

    Besides Isaacson and Brooks, other very prominent liberals who sit on the Trilateral Commission, include former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and MSNBC host Andrea Mitchell.

    What’s to say the entire Trilateral Commission has not had influence on Landrieu’s monument removal decision?

    Whitney Plantation Owner, New Orleans attorney and Democratic-funder John Cummings is also an influential voice in any decision, especially monument removal, that Landrieu makes.

    As the Hayride reported, a source said Cummings was asked by Landrieu to be the anonymous donor to pay for the removal of the monuments. Following that report, Cummings said he was not the donor and said he had no involvement with the issue.

    Back in September, Cummings touted an idea where all Confederate-related monuments and symbols would be placed in one area of the city with interpretive plaques to be an “educational conclusion to a terrible racial issue.”

    Now it seems Landrieu is taking Cummings advice, saying that he is looking into creating some kind of park to place all Confederate monuments and symbols, the exact idea Cummings had months before.

    Interestingly enough, a plan to create and build an entire Civil War park in New Orleans could benefit Cummings since he would be a likely pick for the architect of a potential park being that he is responsible for transforming the Whitney Plantation into a slave museum, which Landrieu praised a few years ago.

    Cummings was apparently in Virginia last week, sources told the Hayride. Ironically, the Fairfax, Virginia school district just announced that they will look into renaming a number of schools named after historical figures.

    The purpose of Sharpton, Isaacson, Brooks and Cummings all pushing the ‘Confederate monuments invoke racism’ narrative is to ultimately sweep the South of symbols from the past that they claim to be offensive to black Americans, even though a number of blacks do not support removing history.

    Meanwhile, the New Orleans media has made the removal of monuments seem like an issue that came from the residents up to Landrieu’s office. When, in actuality, it came down directly from the Landrieu administration with the help of powerful liberal voices driving the narrative as well.

    The first step was going directly through Landrieu to get Lee Circle, PGT Beauregard, Jefferson Davis and the Liberty Monument removed. Tomorrow, the elites will move onto the next pieces: Andrew Jackson’s famous statue in the French Quarter.

    Down the road, they’ll move onto the historical Southern street names (because they’re racist). Then, Landrieu and Company will turn their attention to Catholic street names (because they promote one religion over another).

    Eventually, New Orleans will be unrecognizable.

    And it will be solely a result of well-connected, liberal elites who foisted their politically correct worldview onto the residents of a historically-rich city without checking with the voters first.

    John Binder is a news and political reporter for the Hayride and can be reached at John.Binder@selu.edu. John's reporting has been featured at the Drudge Report, National Review, the National Journal, the Gateway Pundit, Breitbart, the Daily Caller and RedState.

    http://thehayride.com/2015/12/exclus...g-new-orleans/
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    False Notes From Wynton Marsalis Lead To A Divided City
    Ben Jones
    Author, 'Redneck Boy in the Promised Land'
    2:09 PM 12/22/2015


    The City Council of New Orleans, at the behest of Mayor Mitch Landrieu (who in turn was acting as the urging of jazz great Wynton Marsalis) has rewritten history, vilified the 70 million-plus Americans who are descended from the Confederate Army, and ruptured the Big Easy in ways that may take years to repair.

    At a time when national polls show national racial tensions at a level unseen for decades, Mayor Landrieu and the Council have ignited an unnecessary and terribly divisive civic battle over some venerable Confederate statuary, especially the monument to Robert E. Lee in Lee Circle. The sudden opprobrium heaped upon Lee and the Confederacy by Landrieu, Marsalis and the full-throated chorus of the New Orleans Times-Picayune newspaper has not been seen since the War itself, now 150 years into our past.

    The City Council, refusing to seek compromise, voted 6 to 1 to remove the landmark statues of Lee and of New Orleanian Pierre G.T. Beauregard from where they have stood since the 19th century. Two other Confederate memorials are also scheduled for removal.

    I am one of those 70 million Americans whose forefathers fought for the Southern Cause. Like Mr. Marsalis, I cannot change my ancestors. Nor would I wish to. Those men did what they thoroughly believed in their time to be right. Their pictures hang on our walls, their names are in our Bibles, and we put flowers on their graves. They are a part of our families and our heritage, and we understand them in the context of their times. Whatever one may think about their cause with 150 years of hindsight and historical interpretations, one cannot doubt their valor and their sacrifice.

    The fathers of many of those men fought the American Revolution and in the War of 1812. (Lee and Beauregard were highly regarded officers in the Mexican War, and both were commandants of West Point). Since 1865, the South has given a higher percentage of her sons and daughters to combat than any other region. Black and white, from San Juan Hill to Omaha Beach to Fallujah, they have served and they have died.

    In 1861, the Confederacy felt that it was the North who had abrogated the Constitution.

    And the easy sophomoric narrative that the American Civil War was “fought to protect slavery” and that these men were traitors drives much of this demagogic rhetoric. In Lincoln’s first inaugural address, he made it clear that he had no intention of ending slavery. In fact, he urged passage of the Corwin Amendment, which would have made the institution of slavery perpetual in America. Slavery was not the Southern sin, but the National Sin. It built the American economy and Wall Street. Twelve of our first seventeen Presidents were slave owners, including Ulysses S. Grant.

    James Madison, who was most influential in the creation of the Constitution and The Bill of Rights argued, as did Thomas Jefferson, that the sovereign states had the right of secession.

    (Some would question why Lincoln would seek Robert E. Lee to command the Northern forces if it were about ending slavery. Lee’s wife had inherited Martha Washington’s slaves.)

    Historians will cherry-pick facts to suit their conclusions. But, in my opinion, it is a fact that the only good thing about the war was that it ended slavery in America, even though that was not its purpose. (If the war had ended at First Manassas, slavery would have continued, perhaps for decades.)

    It is also a fact that Robert E. Lee was a man of impeccable character and honor. The divisive crusaders of New Orleans are practicing historical “presentism,” i.e., judging the past by current sensibilities and mores.

    When the ever-eloquent Wynton Marsalis was two years old, I was deeply involved in the Civil Rights Movement. It was a dangerous time, and I still have a few scars from my rumbles with the KKK. That was over 50 years ago now. We have come a long, long way in our journey toward the American promise, and we obviously have a long way to go. But the gratuitous and heavy-handed action in New Orleans is a setback to the bridge building that Dr. King and millions of other Americans struggled to achieve.

    What we have in New Orleans is a difference of opinion about the past. It is now a difference of opinion about the law, as the City Council’s decision is going to Federal Court. I hope and pray that the Court will be more circumspect than the political dividers of that great American city.

    http://dailycaller.com/2015/12/22/fa...-divided-city/
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    Survey done following 6-1 vote Highlights Widespread Dissatisfaction with Council Vote
    Published on: 3 January 2016 Charles Marsala



    In July 2015, New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu asked the City Council to begin a process to remove three monuments to US Veterans of the Mexican-American and Civil Wars and a monument to eleven police officers who died in 1874 defending the Louisiana Governor's Administration which consisted of C.C. Antoine, an African-American Lt. Governor.

    In December, Mayor Landrieu announced he did not know where removal process would end. New Orleans has over 250 monuments.

    One group, "Take "em Down NOLA," is requesting numerous other monuments be removed.

    Numerous surveys have shown the majority of those responding do not agree with the Mayor's and City Council to remove the four monuments.

    Three monuments are to West Point Engineering Graduates who were instrumental in Reconstruction of the South, proposed desegregation of schools and were involved in developing the Rail Lines of America's Transportation System, among other achievements.

    During Public comments, citizens representing various Landmark and Historical Non-Profits spoke in favor of a popular vote on the issues or posting more detailed plaques describing the individuals. Their plans were not reviewed.

    Council Member Stacey Head's motions to calling for a town wide vote or plaques, failed for lack of seconds.

    In a survey done by WDSU-TV, the following week after the Council Vote, 97% did not agree with the Majority Vote of the Council.

    Reasons stated in public comments as to the opposition to the Council Vote include:

    1. No plan to return the monuments to public view.

    2. No funds to return the monuments to public view.

    3. No place to return the monuments to public view.

    3. The selection process. The Council is leaving some monuments standing, which should be evaluated for racism, such as one to veterans who fought in the American Indian Wars in the late 1800s. Those Wars took land from American Indians.

    4. Refusing to discuss placing more descriptive content on the monuments to educate on the positive achievements of the entire lives of the initial three Veterans, which Mayor Landrieu seeks to remove.

    5. Removing what is likely millions of dollars of art and an integral part of the tourism industry of New Orleans.

    6. Inconsistencies in logic for removal, as not all are wearing uniforms and the details of their past positions.

    PGT Beauregard served in the US Army from 1834-1861 and the Louisiana National Guard from 1879-1988. Those arguing for removal of his 100 year old monument cite to the fact he is depicted in a Confederate Uniform as opposed to US Army or Louisiana National Guard uniform. In 1873 he became the spokesperson for the Unification Movement and desegregation of schools and transportation.

    Robert E. Lee served in the US Army from 1829-1861 and as President of Washington University from 1865-1870. Lee's name was added to the University following his death. Lee wrote to his wife in an 1856 letter, "... In this enlightened age, there are few I believe, but what will acknowledge, that slavery as an institution, is a moral & political evil in any Country."

    Lee's monument is in a Confederate Uniform.

    Jefferson Davis' Monument depicts Davis in suit. Davis was a US Senator from 1857-1861, US Secretary of War from 1853-1857, and served in the US Army from 1825-1835 and 1846-1847.

    Jefferson Davis and his brother educated and allowed captive Africans to retain money earned commercially. They financed the acquisition of their plantation to partnership of former slaves lead by Benjamin Montgomery, who they had applied for an irrigation patent with in 1858.

    A lawsuit with twelve causes of action has been filed by four non-profits.

    Council Members have 30 days after a vote to announce a desire to re-consider a vote.

    http://uk.blastingnews.com/politics/...-00714289.html
    Laissez les bon temps rouler! Going to church doesn't make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.** a 4 day work week & sex slaves ~ I say Tyt for PRESIDENT! Not to be taken internally, literally or seriously ....Suki ebaynni IS THAT BETTER ?

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    We have tried to tell you it would not stop with Confederate icons.
    Do you get it yet? We told you so...


    March 09, 2016

    Philly's Vietnam Veterans Memorial vandalized

    Officials looking for suspect who stole star medallions


    vandal stole several star medallions from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Old City on Tuesday, CBSPhilly reports.

    Officials are looking for a suspect and plan to check surveillance cameras. The memorial's custodian said he expects that it will cost $700 to $1,500 to replace the medallions.

    “It’s very sad; it’s like somebody sticking a knife in me,” custodian Nick Moran told CBSPhilly.

    Dedicated in 1987, the memorial contains a granite slab engraved with the names of 646 Philadelphia-native soldiers as well as 10 panels that illustrate scenes of war.

    Read the full story here. http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/201...n-center-city/
    Laissez les bon temps rouler! Going to church doesn't make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.** a 4 day work week & sex slaves ~ I say Tyt for PRESIDENT! Not to be taken internally, literally or seriously ....Suki ebaynni IS THAT BETTER ?

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    Laissez les bon temps rouler! Going to church doesn't make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.** a 4 day work week & sex slaves ~ I say Tyt for PRESIDENT! Not to be taken internally, literally or seriously ....Suki ebaynni IS THAT BETTER ?

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