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    Scout Craft Recipes

    How to Make Goop With Cornstarch or Flour
    By Corey M. Mackenzie, eHow Contributor

    Children typically enjoy playing with anything they can squeeze or spread around -- just observe a child playing in the mud and see the joy on his face to know this is true. It is very easy to make play goop at home with simple ingredients from your kitchen. The goop will be non-toxic, but will be pretty messy, so be prepared to have the child play with it in a contained area that you can easily clean.

    Difficulty:Moderately Easy

    •Rubber or vinyl gloves
    •Bowl
    •Cornstarch
    •Flour
    •Food coloring
    •Liquid measuring cup
    •Whisk
    •Fork

    1 Put on rubber or vinyl gloves. This is especially important if you are going to be using food coloring in the goop.

    2 Place 1 cup of flour or cornstarch in a bowl. Add 1 drop of food coloring to the flour or cornstarch, if you are coloring your goop. Food coloring goes a long way, so start out with just 1 drop -- you can always add more coloring later.

    3 Fill a liquid measuring cup with warm water. Slowly add the water while using a whisk or fork to blend it with the flour or cornstarch. Continue adding water until the goop is of the consistency you want.

    4 Knead and mix the goop with your gloved hands. Add more food coloring and water at this time if necessary.

    Tips & Warnings •Goop made with flour will dry out and harden more quickly than goop made with cornstarch.

    •Food coloring will stain. Before letting your child play with goop containing food coloring, make sure he is wearing an apron or other clothing that you don't mind getting stained. Cover play surfaces with newspaper or disposable plastic tablecloths.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_8276561_make...rch-flour.html


    How to Make Goop Without Borax or Cornstarch
    By Laura Leiva, eHow Contributor

    Goo --- which people typically create for a science project or simply for fun --- is most commonly made using cornstarch or borax. If you don't have these ingredients, you can use other materials that are sure to be in your kitchen. Creating a goo for fun is an ideal activity for any rainy day when the kids are cooped up in the house. What's more, goo ingredients are inexpensive, making it an economical craft idea.

    Difficulty:Easy
    Instructions

    •Newspaper
    •Mixing bowl
    •Measuring cups
    •Mixing spoon
    •Table salt
    •Flour
    •Water
    •Food coloring

    1 Cover the crafting area with newspaper to keep the surface from getting dirty or stained while making goo. Gather all the ingredients and place them nearby for easy accessibility.

    2 Mix one cup each of table salt, flour and water in a mixing bowl. Stir thoroughly until all the ingredients are moistened and combined to create goo.

    3 Add a few drops of food coloring of your choice and stir thoroughly. If you want to create more than one color of goo, make additional batches of the material.

    4 Stir to combine ingredients each time you want to use the goo in case any separation occurs between play times.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_7707319_make...ornstarch.html

    How to Make Slime Without Borax or Liquid Starch
    By Ann Hudson, eHow Contributor

    Making homemade slime can be a fun rainy-day activity for kids. There are number of recipes for this gooey substance, and many of them call for borax or liquid starch. Although these ingredients are not overly dangerous, they can be harsh and can cause skin reactions for some children. It is possible, and easy, to make slime without these ingredients by using cornstarch instead.
    Difficulty:Easy
    Instructions

    •Saucepan
    •Bowl
    •Large zip-top bag
    •Stove
    •1 part water
    •2 parts cornstarch
    •Food coloring


    1 Warm the water in the saucepan. Do not bring the water to a boil--it needs to be warm, but not scalding hot. The purpose of heating the water is to keep the cornstarch from clumping together.

    2 Pour the heated water into the bowl and add food coloring. The color is a matter of personal choice, and a few drops are all that are necessary. Kids can get really creative here. Stir until the color is well blended. Keep in mind that the cornstarch will lighten the color, so if you want a more intense color, add more food coloring. A typical slime color is lime green, but you can choose any color your child wants.

    3 Add the cornstarch a little at a time, at a slow and steady pace.

    4 Blend the mixture until smooth. It's OK to use fingers for this step. Have your child help with this mixing once the water feels cooled off enough.

    5 Add more cornstarch slowly if the slime is too runny, or more hot water if the slime is too thick.

    6 Keep the slime in a zip-top bag to make sure that it stays moist.

    Tips & Warnings
    •Slime is a great outdoor toy. Although cornstarch slime is easier to clean up than recipes that call for borax, liquid starch or glue, it can still make quite a mess!

    •Because the water needs to be heated, an adult should always help children with this recipe.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_4898523_make...id-starch.html


    How to Make Silly Putty Slime
    By Karren Doll Tolliver, eHow Contributor

    Kids enjoy playing with toy "slime" that is commercially available at many stores because of the "gross" factor. With a simple recipe, kids can make their own slime for much less money and have even more fun making it. In addition, they can choose whatever color they want, or they can make multiple colors of slime. This is an easy project that can be done very quickly, and kids can play with the slime for hours afterward.

    •4 tbsp. white glue
    • 4 oz Water
    •4 tbsp. borax
    •Food coloring
    •Bowl
    •Plastic zipper bag

    1 Mix the white glue with 4 oz. of water in the bowl.

    2 Add two or three drops of food coloring and mix well. You also can combine colors to make new colors. Combine all the colors to make brown.

    3 Mix the borax with just enough water to make it pourable.

    4 Add half the borax mixture to the glue mixture and stir rapidly for two minutes. If the slime is not thick enough, add more borax mixture until you have the desired consistency.

    5 Store the slime in a sealed plastic bag.

    Tips & Warnings
    •You can find borax (sodium tetraborate) in the supermarket in the laundry section.

    •To make your own version of toy putty, add more Borax mixture so that the result is very thick.

    •Do not leave the slime out of the bag when you are not playing with it. It will dry up.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_5709675_make...tty-slime.html


    How to Make Flubber Without Borax
    By Carolyn Kay Neeley, eHow Contributor
    Kids love goo, there's just no two ways about it. And if you've taken a look at your local toy store lately, flubber is expensive. Fortunately, there is an easy way to make your own flubber without using harsh, powdery borax. Your kids not only will enjoy playing with the finished product, but it's also simple enough that they can make it themselves.

    •1 cup Elmer's glue
    •1 cup liquid laundry starch
    •Disposable plastic spoon
    •Plastic bowl
    •Plastic air-tight container
    •Food coloring (optional)

    1 Pour 1 cup Elmer's glue into a plastic bowl.

    2 Add a few drops of food coloring and stir until the color is mixed throughout. Be aware, however, that some food colorings may stain, so this step is optional.

    3 Add the liquid laundry starch to the glue, a little bit at a time, and stir until the mixture thickens.

    4 Form the mixture into a ball and knead until it holds together well and is smooth. If the flubber is too sticky, add more laundry starch until it becomes rubbery.

    5 Store in an air-tight container.

    Tips & Warnings

    •Do not ingest flubber. Supervise younger children when making flubber.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_4882584_make-flubber-borax.html
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    How to Make Bizarre Slime Without Borax
    By Ann Jones, eHow Contributor


    Call it slime, bizarre slime, gak, goop, oobleck, flubber -- no matter what you call it, kids love to make it. Recipes for stretchy non-Newtonian fluid abound, but many of them call for the addition of borax, a salt-based laundry additive. If you want to make bizarre slime but don't have any borax, you can substitute Epsom salt. When mixed with glue and water, Epsom salt causes a chemical reaction that creates a stretchy putty.

    •2 tsp. Epsom salt
    •4 tbsp. white glue
    •Food coloring
    •1 cup
    •1 bowl
    •Measuring spoon
    •Sandwich bag

    1 Pour 2 teaspoons of Epsom salt and 2 teaspoons of water in a cup.

    2 Stir the Epsom salt and water mixture until the Epsom salt is mostly dissolved. It may not dissolve all the way.

    3 Pour 4 tablespoons of white glue into a bowl. Squeeze 3 drops of food coloring into the glue.

    4 Pour the water and salt mixture into the bowl with the glue.

    5 Smash the glue and water mixture together with your fingers until it turns into slime.

    6 Store the slime in a plastic sandwich bag to keep it fresh between playtimes.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_10015734_mak...ime-borax.html


    How to Make Sticky Slime
    By Axl J. Amistaadt, eHow Contributor

    Make your own nontoxic sticky slime with cornstarch. Kids of all ages love and are fascinated by sticky slime, which you can purchase at toy stores. There's really no need to buy the material, however, when it's so easy to let your kids make it themselves from common household products. Most recipes for homemade sticky slime require the use of borax, which you may not want your children to handle. Cornstarch is an excellent alternative, with the added benefit of producing a far superior sticky factor in the final product. It's highly likely that what your kids will enjoy the most is the tremendous mess they'll make while creating their own sticky slime. The best news for you is that unlike similar messes made with borax and glue, this project cleans up easily with warm water.

    •Cornstarch
    •Bowl
    •Wooden craft sticks
    •Water
    •Disposable cup
    •Food coloring
    •Glitter (optional)
    •Old newspapers

    1 Measure 1 cup of cornstarch into a mixing bowl. Break up larger lumps with a wooden craft stick.

    2 Pour ½ cup of warm water into a disposable cup. Add about 1/8 tsp. of food coloring to the water and stir it with a craft stick to blend thoroughly. Stir in 1/8 tsp. of glitter if you want some sparkle and shine.

    3 Make a well with your finger in the center of the cornstarch. Pour about 1 tbsp. of colored water into the well. Stir continuously with a craft stick to work the cornstarch into the liquid little by little. The mixture will thicken as the cornstarch is blended in.

    4 Add more colored water by teaspoonfuls. Dig in with your hands and knead the slimy concoction until all of the water is absorbed. Add another teaspoon of water.

    5 Knead and mix well in between each addition until the slime becomes too stiff to stir easily before adding the next teaspoon of colored water. Continue kneading the slime and adding water until you've added all the water. Knead until all the water is absorbed.

    6 Pick up a wad of the sticky slime and squeeze it between your fingers. Roll it into ball. As long as you keep the material moving, it will remain solid. Hold the mass over the bowl without squeezing or kneading it. Watch as the sticky slime magically turns back into a thick, runny liquid and oozes from your fingers into the bowl.

    Tips & Warnings

    •Spread out several layers of old newspapers on your work surface. This is a very messy project, no matter how careful the kids try to be. An old T-shirt or paint smock to cover clothing is a good idea if you're using food coloring.

    •Mixing the food coloring into the water at the beginning of the procedure will give your finished sticky slime a nice even color throughout.

    •Don't eat the sticky slime.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_8658186_make-sticky-slime.html


    How to Make Moon Putty
    By Samantha Lowe, eHow Contributor

    Moon putty, also called moon dough, is a commercial product that is able to be molded and played with by kids without drying out or causing a mess. However, it can also be difficult to find on shelves and expensive in large quantities. By creating your own putty, you can create an affordable toy that can be given as a gift or used in the classroom to teach about malleability.

    •2 tablespoons white crafting glue
    •2 tablespoons liquid starch
    •Food coloring
    •Large bowl
    •Fork

    1 Pour the glue in to the large bowl. Add the liquid starch over top.

    2 Add in the food coloring, drop by drop, in to the bowl. Stir while doing so until the desired color is achieved.

    3 Mix the ingredients thoroughly using the fork until a small ball forms. Pour out any liquid that has formed on the bottom.

    4 Knead the moon putty for four to five minutes, or until it is smooth and elastic.

    5 Store the putty in a plastic bag or plastic container. Keep it indefinitely.

    Tips & Warnings

    •Create larger batches to hand out to a variety of kids, or, if they are old enough, create the moon putty with them in a group or classroom environment.

    •Substitute the liquid starch with 2 tbsp. Borax and 2 tbsp. warm water mixed together.

    http://www.ehow.com/print/how_859134...oon-putty.html

    [b]Removing Moon Dough From the Carpet[/n]
    By Kaye Wagner, eHow Contributor

    Moon Dough is a brand of children’s play putty. Prevent damage to your carpet by making sure your children play with it over a non-porous surface. If you notice it on the carpet, pick it up before it gets smashed deep into the carpet fibers where it will be harder to access. Don’t use water to clean Moon Dough as it will enable the color of the putty to transfer to the carpet.

    •Moon Dough
    •Wide-toothed comb
    •Vacuum
    •Dry cleaning solvent

    1 Press a piece of Moon Dough over the stain on the carpet to pick up as much of the Moon Dough stain as possible. Continue until the stain is gone.

    2 Run a wide toothed comb or stiff plastic brush through the carpet to dislodge any pieces of the dough that are still stuck to the carpet fibers and vacuum. Continue until the Moon Dough is completely gone.

    3 Vacuum the area to remove any remaining Moon Dough.

    4 Blot dry cleaning solvent on the area to remove the rest of the stain.

    5 Rinse the area with water from a damp cloth and blot it dry. Repeat the process until the area is rinsed and feels like the surrounding carpet.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_12086790_rem...gh-carpet.html

    How to Make a Bouncy Ball With Slime
    By Axl J. Amistaadt, eHow Contributor


    Kids neither know nor care much about polymers or chemistry, but they sure do love slime. You can show your kids how to have more fun with slime by turning it into a bouncy ball. The secret is the addition of that most magical of ingredients: everyday cornstarch.

    •2 cups warm water
    •2 disposable plastic cups
    •Craft sticks
    •1/2 teaspoon borax
    •1 tablespoon all-purpose white glue (not school glue)
    •Food coloring
    •1 tablespoon cornstarch
    •Sealable plastic bag

    1 Pour the water into a cup and stir in the borax with the craft stick until the borax is dissolved.

    2 Pour the glue into another cup. Add the food coloring one drop at a time, stirring well with a fresh craft stick after each addition, until you're happy with the shade.

    3 Add the borax mixture and cornstarch to the glue. Let it set for 15 seconds. Stir the mixture with a craft stick until it becomes too difficult to stir.

    4 Dip the sticky slime out of the cup with your hand. Squish it, roll it and knead it. As you work the slime, it will become more solid and lose its sliminess. Work it until it's no longer sticky.

    5 Mold the slime into a ball.

    •Store your bouncy ball in an airtight sealable plastic bag.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_8393079_make...all-slime.html

    How to Make Silly Putty With Sta-Flo Liquid Starch & Glue
    By Alexis Rohlin, eHow Contributor


    You can make homemade silly putty with a mixture of Sta-Flo liquid starch and white glue. Homemade silly putty made with liquid starch and white glue will not pick up images like commercial silly putty does, but it will still have the characteristic texture of the putty. Silly putty that is made with liquid starch and glue is nontoxic, but be careful when playing with it, as it can stick to clothes and stain them.

    •2 cups white glue
    •1-qt. zip-top plastic bag
    •1 cup Sta-Flo liquid starch
    •Food coloring

    1 Add 2 cups white glue and 1 cup Sta-Flo liquid starch to the zip-top plastic bag. Seal the bag and shake it to begin mixing the glue and starch together.

    2 Knead the glue and starch in the bag until it is thoroughly mixed. Add three drops food coloring to the mixture. Close the bag and knead it for five minutes.

    3 Remove the silly putty from the bag. Pull and stretch the putty apart like you are pulling taffy. Keep pulling and stretching the silly putty to add air to it and dry it out for 10 minutes. When it starts to snap apart, it is done. Place the silly putty in an airtight container to store it.

    Tips & Warnings

    •If the silly putty is too thick, add 1 tsp. white glue to the mixture. If the silly putty is too thin, add 1/2 tsp. starch.

    •Do not let the silly putty come into contact with clothes or carpet; it will adhere to it and stain the fabric.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_8293092_make...arch-glue.html
    Last edited by Jolie Rouge; 01-19-2012 at 05:12 PM.
    Laissez les bon temps rouler! Going to church doesn't make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.** a 4 day work week & sex slaves ~ I say Tyt for PRESIDENT! Not to be taken internally, literally or seriously ....Suki ebaynni IS THAT BETTER ?

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    Homemade Sidewalk Chalk

    Spending the afternoon creating a sidewalk masterpiece is a great way for your kids to enjoy a spring day. But long after their fantastic artwork has washed away, your kids will remember making their own colored chalk!

    Materials needed:
    1 cup plaster of Paris
    1 cup water
    Powdered tempera paint
    Mold for chalk (small paper cups, ice cube trays, tissue rolls, etc.)
    Mixing bowl and spoon


    What to do:

    Step One: In a large bowl, mix the water and plaster of Paris together.

    Step Two: Add the powdered tempera paint to the mixture.

    Step Three: Once the paint has been mixed in well, set it aside for a few minutes.

    Step Four: Pour the mixture into the mold and let it dry. This can take anywhere from several hours to a day (or maybe longer), depending on the size of the mold. Remember: The bigger the mold, the longer it will take to dry.

    Step Five: Once the mold is dry, remove the chalk. If the chalk is still moist, let it air dry for another 24 hours.

    Now your kids can have a blast drawing with the chalk they created. Anything they draw will be washed away by the rain, so don't worry if they accidentally get some on the side of your house



    How to Make Sidewalk Paint
    X eHow Hobbies, Games & Toys EditorThis article was created by a professional writer and edited by experienced copy editors, both qualified members of the Demand Media Studios community. All articles go through an editorial process that includes subject matter guidelines, plagiarism review, fact-checking, and other steps in an effort to provide reliable information.

    By an eHow Contributor

    Print this articleDrawing with sidewalk chalk has been an activity enjoyed by children for years. Expand on that idea with sidewalk paint to create a masterpiece. The idea gets even better when you can make sidewalk paint yourself for much less than what you would pay for it in a craft store. Read on to discover how easy it is to make your own

    •Small bowls or containers
    •1/4 cup cornstarch
    •1/4 cup cold water
    •tempra paints
    •Paintbrushes
    •Hose
    Suggest Edits

    1
    Place cornstarch in a small bowl or container. Clean margarine tubs work well as they can be covered.
    2
    Stir in cold water until cornstarch dissolves. The cornstarch thickens the sidewalk paint so that it sticks to the concrete surface that is being painted.
    3
    Add food coloring of choice. Start with 3 to 4 drops and increase the amount until you have the color you want.
    4
    Repeat the above steps to make different colors of sidewalk paint.
    5
    Use separate paintbrushes for each color of sidewalk paint you have made and let the little artists have a blast painting any concrete in sight.
    6
    Spray off sidewalk paint with a hose. The cornstarch in the paint makes it easy to wash off and is biodegradable
    Tips & Warnings
    •Dip sidewalk chalk in water to make darker lines in your sidewalk paint designs.

    •Have children wear an adult's cast off dress shirt backwards as a coverup to protect clothes.
    Laissez les bon temps rouler! Going to church doesn't make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.** a 4 day work week & sex slaves ~ I say Tyt for PRESIDENT! Not to be taken internally, literally or seriously ....Suki ebaynni IS THAT BETTER ?

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    Luck of the Straw



    Celebrate St. Patrick's Day by making a Brigid's cross, a craft honoring one of Ireland's patron saints. Traditionally these crosses are made of rushes, which grow wild in marshy areas. We wove our cross from colored craft-store raffia.

    Total Time Needed: 30 Minutes or less


    First, moisten the raffia by wetting it with warm water and allowing it to sit for 10 minutes. Use scissors to trim the raffia pieces to about 20 inches long.

    Lay one or two strands vertically on your table. Fold a second strand or two in half around the middle of the first, with the ends pointing to the right (figure 1).


    Rotate your project a quarter turn. Fold a third strand or two around the second (figure 2).



    Rotate the project again and add a fourth strand (figure 3).




    Repeat these steps until your cross is as big as you'd like (ours uses 13 pieces), then tie the ends of the cross's arms with scrap pieces of raffia.
    Last edited by Jolie Rouge; 01-20-2012 at 11:08 AM.
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    The Eight Basic Outdoor Skills


    Skill 1 : Know and practice good outdoor manners in town and in the country.

    Discuss how far camp is from home. Look at a map of the camp. Talk about how you will get there and back. Discuss proper traveling behavior. Vote on where to take a walk and then do it.

    OUTDOOR MANNERS: Have permission before entering private property. Close gates behind you. Do not litter, show respect for people around you and the property you are on. Discuss rules of the road.

    RULES OF THE ROAD: Walk on the left side of the road, facing oncoming traffic. Walk in a single file line along roads. Do not separate to both sides of the road to avoid approaching traffic. Obey traffic signals and walk signs.

    SAFETY PRECAUTIONS: Use the buddy system, stay together with your group. Know plans for bad weather or emergencies.



    Skill 2: Know how to dress for the outdoors in your locality, considering weather forecasts.

    Discuss the weather and what kinds of clothing are appropriate for camping. Learn to make a bedroll.

    What clothing is needed for outdoor activities in each of the 4 seasons? "Be prepared" in important when planning what to wear...be ready for sun, wind and rain. Include sturdy shoes, socks, cap, scarf/hat, jeans or shorts on an outdoor clothing list. Dress in layers - extra clothing can be taken off and tied around the waist.

    Skill 3 : Know how to tie, use, and release a square know and a clove hitch.

    Divide the girls into groups. Give each girl two pieces of rope, each about a foot long. Clothes line or venetian blind cord is best, but any rope is adequate. Line the girls up, back to back. Show one group how to make a square knot. Another person shows the other group how to make a clove hitch. When a girl has mastered her knot, she raises it in one hand. When the girl behind her masters her knot. The "partners" then turn around to face each other and teach their knot to the other.


    Brownies: Be able to tie, use and release an overhand and square knot.

    Junior, Cadette and Seniors: Be able to tie, use and release an overhand, square knot, and a clove hitch. Be able to whip the end of a rope.


    Skill 4: Know how to handle and care for a knife.

    Discuss some of the important rules of knife-handling use and care to half the troop while half does some other project. When the second half returns to the circle, have the first half explain what they learned to them. Practice opening and closing a knife and whittling a point on a stick. Let each girl try. Practice proper handling by carving a soft bar of soap (try a soap boat with a bar of floating Ivory soap with a toothpick and paper sail).

    ** The use of knives is not included in the Brownie GS Handbook

    *** Brownies should learn the basics of knife use and safety, indicated by the ***. Junior, Cadettes and Seniors should know all of the information below:

    Know the parts of a knife.**

    Understand the importance of using a safety circle (be an arms length away from anyone else when using a knife. ***

    Know how to pass and carry a knife. ***

    Know how to safely open and close a knife. ***

    Know why a dull knife is unsafe. ***

    Know how to clean and oil a knife.

    Know how to sharpen a knife.

    Know how to whittle safely.


    Skill 5: Know how to make, use, and put out a fire for outdoor cooking.

    Learn to waterproof matches. Learn about tinder, kindling, and fuel. Learn about types of wood fires. Demonstrate a foundation fire. Learn the do's and don't of fire building. You may break the girls into groups for this and then have each group do a demonstration.

    Understand the conservation of wood resources - build only the size fire you need.

    Be able to choose and prepare a fire site.

    Know the three sizes of firewood.

    Be able to build and maintain a neat woodpile - in an established camp, leave at least enough dry wood for the next group to have a fire.

    Know fire safety precautions - including no fire is ever lit unless a bucket of water is nearby.

    Be able to light and re-fuel a fire.

    Be able to put out a fire safely.

    (Katie's note: Make edible campfires for practice!)

    Skill 6: Know how to cook something for yourself, something for the patrol or troop.

    Have one lunch or supper meeting for the whole troop. Have one patrol cook, one set the table, and one sing and prepare the beverage. Make s'mores for dessert and share the clean up duties.

    Be able to plan a balanced meal.

    Know what equipment and utensils are necessary to prepare the meal.

    Be able to chose a dining area and plan a grace.

    Know how to soap a pan on the outside for easier cleanup.

    Be able to clean up all dishes, pots, etc. as well as the dining area

    Skill 7: Know simple first aid for cuts, insect bits, skinned knees.

    Play "Kim's Game" with first aid kit items. Cover with a cloth before the girls arrive. Pass out paper and pencils. Uncover the items for a minute and give the girls a chance to look them over, then recover. Have the girls silently list all the items they can remember. After five minutes let the girls share their lists and discuss what each item would be used for. Talk about Poison Ivy, personal hygiene, and basic first aid skills.

    Use caution during outdoor activities to prevent accidents from happening. Know simple first aid for the following: infections, bites and stings, burns, heat exhaustion, hypothermia, frostbite, blisters, splinters and animal and snake bite precaution.

    Skill 8: Understand Minimum Impact and know how to protect the natural world. ( LEAVE NO TRACE )

    Discuss what measures should be taken to protect the natural world. Use caution and good judgment when collecting samples for nature study or materials for crafts. Do not pick or damage endangered or protected plants. Collect only dead wood for fires. Do not cut down trees or take live branches. Do not tease or encourage wild animals or intrude on their houses. Conserve water and other resources. Learn to appreciate nature and begin to understand its fragile balance.

    Pack it in, pack it out. Do not leave litter, equipment or any other signs that you have been in a natural area. Stay on established paths (prevents erosion and keeps plants from getting trampled).

    http://www.scoutingweb.com/scoutingw...lsBracelet.htm
    Laissez les bon temps rouler! Going to church doesn't make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.** a 4 day work week & sex slaves ~ I say Tyt for PRESIDENT! Not to be taken internally, literally or seriously ....Suki ebaynni IS THAT BETTER ?

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    Outdoor Skills



    This Camporee Outdoor Skills page has tabs with information about:
    <> Using a Compass
    <> Building a Fire
    <> Marking a Trail
    <> Using a Knife Safely
    <> Tying Knots
    <> Making Emergency Shelter
    <> Estimating time and distances
    <> Building and Cooking with a Box Oven
    <> Where to learn more about First Aid

    Lashing is covered on a separate Outdoor Skills page, that illustrates outdoor construction projects using sticks and twine.

    These skills, along with cooking and first aid, will come in handy during Camporee events, and at many other times throughout your life.

    Many of the illustrations on these tabs were taken from the 1984 edition of the book "Outdoor Education in Girl Scouting", published by the Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. Although that edition seems to be out of print and unavailable, a more recent edition is available from the Girl Scouts of the USA Online Shopping Mall, and used copies are available inexpensively from Amazon.com. This excellent book covers these topics with greater depth and detail, including hints and exercises.

    http://www.girlscoutsofpaloalto.org/outdoorskills.html
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    Outdoor Activities for 20 8-Year-Olds
    By Sonia Polinsky, eHow Contributor | updated April 15, 2011

    Outdoor activities support the healthy development of growing youth. In his book "Last Child in the Woods," Audubon medal-winning author Richard Louv explores the connection between time spent in nature and the physical and emotional health of children and adults. The restrictions of long days in school combined with endless hours on electronic systems can result in cranky, anti-social, hyperactive children needing the recuperative powers of fresh air and the simplicity of nature.

    Outdoor Fun Running Games

    The egg-on-a-spoon race challenges runners to speed down a course balancing a hard-boiled egg on a spoon. Two teams relay the eggs with often hilarious results until all teammates have had a turn. The first team done wins.

    A game that's always a favorite with kids, pick-pocket tag can be played at a backyard party or the park. Much like flag football minus the football, pick-pocket tag players chase each other around the field trying to pull material strips from each other's pockets; the player with the most strips at the end wins.

    Stationary Games

    The human knot game inspires laughter from start to finish. Players hold hands with two different people, crisscrossed over or under other people. With a knot established, the team guides each other out of the knot without letting go of each other's hands.

    Players become detectives when they're blindfolded and only allowed to use touch and smell to find their shoes in a pile of everyone's footwear. The first player to find both of his shoes wins the blindfolded shoe shuffle game.

    Daytime and Nightime

    A picnic outside on a beautiful day turns the everyday lunch routine into the stuff of memories. Themes for food types, color schemes, costumes or games can be used to add a festive flair or party-like atmosphere to any picnic.

    On a warm night, an impromptu camping trip in the backyard keeps everyone entertained. It's as easy as setting up some tents and making s'mores.

    Outdoor Lessons

    Kids enjoy a refreshing lesson in the great outdoors on a nature walk. Lessons and assignments pertaining to the walk experience can include graphing, comparisons, written evaluations, artistic representations and more.

    Set up the art supplies outside to enjoy a particularly messy art project. Beautiful weather only makes getting dirty while creating something beautiful all the more fun.



    Read more: Outdoor Activities for 20 8-Year-Olds | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_8233238_out...#ixzz1oCzbohhT
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    Dakota fire hole for efficient cooking and minimal smoke signature

    If you ever need to build a fire to cook or heat with out in the open and you are trying to keep a low profile and remain hidden. The Dakota fire hole is a good way of doing it. While it most likely won’t be totally smokeless it will have a lot less smoke than a traditional camp fire. The Dakota fire hole is also a great way to have a fire when it is very windy because the actual fire is below ground level so it doesn’t get blown out and the embers don’t blow around. Freedom of the Hills has a great tutorial with a bunch of pictures and tells you how to build a Dakota fire hole. Never know when you may need this info.




    http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=66440


    http://thehomesteadsurvival.com/dako...oke-signature/
    Laissez les bon temps rouler! Going to church doesn't make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.** a 4 day work week & sex slaves ~ I say Tyt for PRESIDENT! Not to be taken internally, literally or seriously ....Suki ebaynni IS THAT BETTER ?

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    Dakota fire hole for efficient cooking and minimal smoke signature

    If you ever need to build a fire to cook or heat with out in the open and you are trying to keep a low profile and remain hidden. The Dakota fire hole is a good way of doing it. While it most likely won’t be totally smokeless it will have a lot less smoke than a traditional camp fire. The Dakota fire hole is also a great way to have a fire when it is very windy because the actual fire is below ground level so it doesn’t get blown out and the embers don’t blow around. Freedom of the Hills has a great tutorial with a bunch of pictures and tells you how to build a Dakota fire hole. Never know when you may need this info.




    http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=66440


    http://thehomesteadsurvival.com/dako...oke-signature/
    Laissez les bon temps rouler! Going to church doesn't make you a Christian any more than standing in a garage makes you a car.** a 4 day work week & sex slaves ~ I say Tyt for PRESIDENT! Not to be taken internally, literally or seriously ....Suki ebaynni IS THAT BETTER ?

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