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Jolie Rouge
06-18-2007, 03:24 PM
The ACLU says it has nothing to do with religion. :rolleyes:


The American Civil Liberties Union has given their blessing to the public funding of Islamic footbaths at the University of Michigan, to let Muslims wash their feet before prayers.

This pleases CAIR greatly, because now the Islamic community won’t have to pay for them. And also because it’s another small step toward shari’a.

Notice how the Detroit News continues to quote CAIR representatives without mentioning that the group has been named an unindicted co-conspirator in the Hamas funding trial of the Holy Land Foundation.


Muslims won't fund footbaths
Leaders cite ACLU's decision not to oppose use of public money for UM-Dearborn project.

http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070618/METRO/706180361&imw=Y

DEARBORN — Muslim leaders in Metro Detroit have decided not to raise private money to pay for two footbaths at a local college campus now that the American Civil Liberties Union has said the plan doesn’t pose constitutional problems.

The University of Michigan-Dearborn’s plan to spend $25,000 on the footbaths was criticized on conservative blogs and radio shows this month. Critics said using public money for the project would violate the First Amendment, which says governments can’t favor or subsidize religions.

Muslims are required to wash body parts, including feet, up to five times daily before prayers. University officials say the floor-level wash basins are needed because some students at the 8,600-student campus wash their feet in the sinks.

Dawud Walid, executive director of the Michigan chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), said his group was concerned a public outcry would cause the university to back down from the project. “If the ACLU had decided to take legal action against the UM-Dearborn, we probably would have called for the university to raise the funds privately, just so that the UM-Dearborn wouldn’t have to go through the trouble of having to defend its position against the ACLU,” Walid said.

Kary Moss, director of the Detroit branch of the ACLU, said its review concluded the plan is a “reasonable accommodation” to resolve “safety and cleanliness issues” that arose when Muslims used public sinks for foot cleaning before prayers, which often spilled water on bathroom floors. “We view it as an attempt to deal with a problem, not an attempt to make it easier for Muslims to pray,” said Moss, who likened the plan to paying for added police during religious events with huge turnouts. “There’s no intent to promote religion.”


I wonder if the ACLU will fund a fountain for baptisms ? Or a Holy Water Font for the Catholics to bless themselves before meals ( or tests ) ?

queenangie
06-18-2007, 03:45 PM
The Muslim footwashing seems to be a religious activity to me.

The ACLU will never do anything for Christians.

cSoReNSoN
06-18-2007, 03:56 PM
The University of Michigan-Dearborn is my alma mater, so I have personal insight into this matter. As stated by the ACLU, the University is not endorsing any religion as the footbaths are open to all students to use. No praying occurs during the footwashing, hence it is not a religious activity anyways. I personally never witnessed any students washing feet in the sinks, but agree a footbath is a much better option for health and safety reasons. There is already a nice fountain on campus, so if Catholics would like to bless themselves before a meal or test they are more than welcome to do so. The footbaths will not have any religious scripture on them, so one is not endorsing any sort of religion. Now had the footbaths been designated for only Muslim students or contained religious scripture upon them, then it would be endorsing religion; which is obviously not the case here.

Johnsmom
06-18-2007, 04:56 PM
The University of Michigan-Dearborn is my alma mater, so I have personal insight into this matter. As stated by the ACLU, the University is not endorsing any religion as the footbaths are open to all students to use. No praying occurs during the footwashing, hence it is not a religious activity anyways. I personally never witnessed any students washing feet in the sinks, but agree a footbath is a much better option for health and safety reasons. There is already a nice fountain on campus, so if Catholics would like to bless themselves before a meal or test they are more than welcome to do so. The footbaths will not have any religious scripture on them, so one is not endorsing any sort of religion. Now had the footbaths been designated for only Muslim students or contained religious scripture upon them, then it would be endorsing religion; which is obviously not the case here.

Are the fountains full of Holy Water? Catholics don't go around blessing themselves with water from fountains. I'm also curious as to who else would actually use these footbaths.

cSoReNSoN
06-18-2007, 05:35 PM
Anybody that would like to use the footbaths may do so. Well, a fountain of "holy water" would be promoting a religion, so that would not be allowed. I am not Catholic, so I wasn't aware it had to be "holy water". The footbaths are simply water from the public water system, therefore not water of a religious affliation. The water in the footbaths will not be blessed by any religious figure, so a Catholic or atheist need not feel offended if utilizing the footbath. It doesn't matter if non-Muslims choose not to use the footbath. What matters is non-Muslims are given the option to use the footbath. If one doesn't want to use the footbath, one is not obliged to do so. It's a rather simple notion. As an alumnus, I support the diversity that is present on campus.

Johnsmom
06-18-2007, 05:52 PM
Anybody that would like to use the footbaths may do so. Well, a fountain of "holy water" would be promoting a religion, so that would not be allowed. I am not Catholic, so I wasn't aware it had to be "holy water". The footbaths are simply water from the public water system, therefore not water of a religious affliation. The water in the footbaths will not be blessed by any religious figure, so a Catholic or atheist need not feel offended if utilizing the footbath. It doesn't matter if non-Muslims choose not to use the footbath. What matters is non-Muslims are given the option to use the footbath. If one doesn't want to use the footbath, one is not obliged to do so. It's a rather simple notion. As an alumnus, I support the diversity that is present on campus.


Yes, I understand that it's a "simple notion" but I really think it's more of a technicality. I don't think others will use the footbath and it is primarily there for muslims. The main point I wanted to make is that fountains aren't of use for Catholic religious practice. I am not offended by the presence of any religion in a public place so long as goverment money doesn't pay for it. I think this is exactly that, but since others can "technically" use the footbaths, it's allowed. I think they need to put kneelers on campus that "anyone" can use.

queenangie
06-18-2007, 06:55 PM
I saw footbaths at Niagara Falls on vacation. The only ones using them were Muslims.

Jolie Rouge
06-18-2007, 08:27 PM
The ACLU mandates a separation of church and state. Ritual footbaths are a religious symbol.

How long before the CAIR starts agitating to make the foot-bath-equipped restrooms "muslim-only", because of defilement ( meaning kuffir have used any part of them... ) ?

The ACLU (and other extremists) invariably downplay the role of personal responsibility.


...a “reasonable accommodation” to resolve “safety and cleanliness issues” that arose when Muslims used public sinks for foot cleaning before prayers, which often spilled water on bathroom floors.

“We view it as an attempt to deal with a problem,...

It seems the problem here is a group of people who aren't willing to clean up after themselves. " Hey! You got water all over the floor! Why don't you clean that up?!? "

No, let's use tax dollars to keep them from making a mess in the first place.

I'm sick of people screaming, "My Rights! My Rights! My Rights!" when they're unwilling to be reminded of their responsibilities.

Let see... put a little plastic dish pan in your back pack. Fill it at the drinking fountain. Wash feet.

Problem solved.

stresseater
06-18-2007, 08:52 PM
Anybody that would like to use the footbaths may do so.

How long before the CAIR starts agitating to make the foot-bath-equipped restrooms "muslim-only", because of defilement ( meaning kuffir have used any part of them... ) ?
Oh Jolie you beat me to the punch. That was going to be my question....Do people REALLY believe the Muslims will allow unclean people to use them for anything without pitching a fit? I sure don't. :slap

Jolie Rouge
06-18-2007, 09:13 PM
$25,000 on the footbaths versus $1.99 for plastic tubs

You do the math....

TMT
06-19-2007, 09:13 AM
I wouldn't be surprised in the least if the filthy kuffirs begin "defiling" the footbaths as soon as they are installed.

These are college students we're talking about....

queenangie
06-19-2007, 06:52 PM
What is it that teens always put in fountains to make bubbles, bubbles, and more bubbles?

Jolie Rouge
07-03-2007, 04:28 PM
Report: Muslim integration crucial to US
By ERIC GORSKI, AP Religion Writer
Tue Jun 26, 12:43 AM ET

A better-integrated Muslim population would better serve the United States as it navigates critical domestic and foreign-policy challenges involving Muslim populations, a new report argues.

Sponsored by the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, the report released Tuesday says that greater U.S. Muslim involvement in the public square is crucial to the nation's security and well-being, and that Muslims are largely responsible for finding ways to make themselves heard.

The report by a 32-member nationwide task force culled from academia, politics and the business and nonprofit worlds largely avoids sensitive questions about attitudes toward U.S. foreign and security policy. "This is a group that is half-Muslim, half non-Muslim that came together because we believe that America is losing by not having the appropriate involvement of Muslim Americans in the civil discourse of politics," said task force co-chair Lynn Martin, a former Republican congresswoman and secretary of labor in the George H.W. Bush administration. "This is not whiny. This is not about what's wrong. What it says is, here are some potential solutions."

Among them: expanded counterterrorism partnerships between Muslim Americans and law enforcement, development of a leadership network of prominent Muslim Americans to work with youth and serve as "community ambassadors," building stronger Muslim American institutions and working with coalitions on common concerns like immigration and health care.

The report also calls on the media and government to fairly portray and involve Muslims in the national discourse, but suggests Muslims carry greater responsibility.

One of the American Muslim community's defining characteristics — its diversity — poses a challenge when identifying potential leaders and organizing, said Farooq Kathwari, another task force co-chair. Kathwari is chairman, president and chief executive officer of Ethan Allen Interiors Inc., one of the nation's largest furniture companies. "It is not an easy situation for Muslim Americans because they are not one, they are not monolithic," he said. "The only reason now they're getting together — like African-Americans got together — is for civil rights."

The report maintains that a good foundation exists because most Muslims see no contradiction between their faith and American values — and also makes clear the consequences of failure when tensions remain high over terrorism. "The gathering climate of suspicion and mutual mistrust, exacerbated by the lack of engagement and dialogue, threatens to marginalize and alienate some Muslim Americans to the point where the danger of radicalization of a small minority could become a real possibility," the report says. "It would take only a single, significant act of terrorism in the United States involving Muslim Americans to cement the impression that rampant radicalism has taken root within the community."

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan group that aims to influence discourse on global issues.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070626/ap_on_re_us/muslims_security

On the Net: Chicago Council on Global Affairs: http://www.thechicagocouncil.org/

Bubblescc
07-03-2007, 07:50 PM
[QUOTE=
Jolie Rouge


I'm sick of people screaming, "My Rights! My Rights! My Rights!" when they're unwilling to be reminded of their responsibilities.


QUOTE]

:clapping :rock: :groupsmilie

Jolie Rouge
07-26-2007, 10:24 PM
http://powerlineblog.com/archives/018351.php

http://powerlineblog.com/archives/018351.php

janelle
07-26-2007, 10:49 PM
UMMM, I really don't want anybody getting water from the drinking fountain for their foot baths and then dumping the water back in when they are done. EWWWWWWW.

Any other solutions?

mary987
07-27-2007, 09:27 AM
While I want to avoid the politics of it all, I find it necessary to address the original title of this thread: "The ACLU Has Found a Religion It *Will* Defend". The ACLU works to protect all people from religious discrimination. While the most visible of cases tends to be those where they are looking to do things such as remove religious iconography from public spaces, they also work to defend the rights of religious individuals to express their religious beliefs/opinions, etc.

Follow the links to their website to read several instances in which they have defended the rights of Christians:

__________________________________________________ __________

After ACLU Intervention on Behalf of Christian Valedictorian, Michigan High School Agrees to Stop Censoring Religious Yearbook Entries

http://www.aclu.org/studentsrights/expression/12845prs20040511.html

__________________________________________________ ___________

ACLU of Louisiana Files Lawsuit to Protect Free Speech Rights of Christian Protestor

http://www.aclu.org/freespeech/protest/27266prs20061027.html

Louisiana Court Affirms Christian Protester's Free Speech Rights

http://www.aclu.org/religion/frb/28163prs20070129.html

__________________________________________________ _______

Appeals Court Overturns Ban on Christian Preacher in Rhode Island Prison

http://www.aclu.org/religion/frb/29578prs20070409.html

__________________________________________________ _______

While it is not necessary to agree with any organization's stance, and I'm not suggesting you do, I feel it is critical to get an accurate portrayal of what that organization is about.

Val1
07-27-2007, 06:12 PM
I totally don't have a problem with them installing the foot baths if it means a more hygenic restroom. I guess I see it more along the lines of some universities offering kosher meals in the cafeteria, or serving fish options on Fridays in Lent - more of a courtesy to respect the differences of their students. I mean, don't most universities have a nondenominational chapel that anyone can use? And anyone can use the footbaths, though truthfully I am sure they are mostly going to be used by the Muslim students.

If that is a no-no, why no uproar about kosher selections at the cafeteria?

Val1
07-27-2007, 06:19 PM
Just wanted to add that while I am not a big fan of the ACLU because I disagree with some of the people they choose to represent (NAMBLA, anyone? UGH!), they have certainly represented Christians in cases in the past. For example:

http://www.aclu.org/studentsrights/expression/12845prs20040511.html

http://www.aclu.org/religion/govtfunding/22354prs20051206.html

The truth is, they will represent ANYONE whom they believe may be having their rights legally repressed - even those cases of free speech that some of us may find morally repugnant. They are not advocating the cause so much - be it Christianity, Islam, or whatever - but rather the person's right to pursue legal recourse on ANY topic.

Jolie Rouge
07-27-2007, 08:57 PM
If that is a no-no, why no uproar about kosher selections at the cafeteria?

I will restate my position


$25,000 on the footbaths versus $1.99 for plastic tubs

You do the math....

Offering a kosher or fish selection in the cafeteria doesn't cost the taxpayers $25,000 nor are they reserved for a select few. In order for the Muslims to use the footbaths, they must remain "undefiled" ... meaning non muslims are not permitted to use them. If they wish to wash their feet for prayer, why not take responsibility on their own ( pouring the water in the wash basins or into a toilet, Janelle not the drinking fountains ). If I want a fish sandwich during Lent, I can pack a tuna sandwich.

janelle
07-27-2007, 11:22 PM
They need to find a locker room on campus that has showers. Go there and wash your feet. No extra money to install anything. Go find a place that already has facilities. If you want no one but muslims in it then build it yourself. That gets into a religious observance type of thing. Include everyone or make it exclusive and put up the money yourself llike all religions have to do.

Jolie Rouge
09-01-2007, 08:33 PM
Scholar clears up meaning of jihad!
More soothing nonsense
September 1, 2007

Alas, I must run out and don't have time for a full discussion of this piece, "The Koran and non-Muslims – myths versus facts," by Mustafa Akyol (with whom I had some exchanges a few years ago -- search the archives) in the Turkish Daily News, although I hope to get to it later. Still, I had to stop and post about this, because if I had a nickel for every time I've heard this, I'd be a very rich man:


One should also note the Koranic verse which tells that “all who have faith in God and the Last Day and act rightly” including “those who are Jews, and the Christians” will be rewarded by God in afterlife. (2:62)

In other words, the Koran does not denounce Jewish and Christians an “unbelievers,” as it is often thought.

Why not just tell the truth and deal with that? Is Mr. Akyol unaware of the existence of these passages?


"They indeed have disbelieved who say: Lo! Allah is the Messiah, son of Mary." -- Qur'an 5:17

The key word in that verse is kafara, كَفَرَ. Derived from kufr, unbelief.

And 4:44-59 is an invective against the People of the Book in general and the Jews in particular. The Jews “traffic in error” and, and wish that the Muslims would “lose the right path” (v. 44). They twist Allah’s words, and Allah has “cursed them for their unbelief” -- كُفْرِهِمْ, kufrihim (v. 46) -- again, derived from kufr.

There, then, are two Qur'anic passages clearly calling Christians and Jews unbelievers -- which Mustafa Akyol and many, many others say the Qur'an never does. I have often been criticized for not being as enthusiastic about this or that Islamic reformer as others think I should have been. Well, here is a good example of why I find so often that my enthusiasm is dampened. Whether Mr. Akyol doesn't know that the Qur'an actually does call Jews and Christians unbelievers, and that mainstream Muslim exegetes interpret 2:62 as meaning only that Jews and Christians who accept Islam will be saved, or whether he just doesn't want us to know all this, I have no way of knowing. But either way, his writings are not going to impress any jihadists or make them discard their notions of Islamic supremacism.

http://www.jihadwatch.org/archives/018000.php

Jolie Rouge
09-06-2007, 01:48 PM
Muslim Student Association Harasses Women and Jews at University of Texas-San Antonio”


Happily, they shot their own video to document the occasion.

http://littlegreenfootballs.com/weblog/?entry=26942&only&rss


I’m interested to hear what the diversity czars and the risk-averse university bureaucrats have to say about this kind of identitarian political activism — not because I’m particularly bothered by it (the video shows the MSA for the repressive ideologues and wannabe zealous thugs they are, and frankly, I find it refreshing to see such free speech aired on a university campus for a change) — but rather because a university-sanctioned group is performing such confrontational activism on a university campus, where “hate” is purportedly disallowed.

This puts diversity advocates and university administrators in quite a bind, I should think. Because to “tolerate” the political activism of the MSA, the university must simultaneously allow for “hatred” against women and Jews (the latter not really much of a problem, of course — provided the wretched Zionists don’t threaten to sue). Unless, that is, one is able to alter what constitutes “hate” by simultaneously altering the feminist narrative to conclude that Muslim women who “Americanize” are somehow traitors to their own cultural foundationalism, and so shouldn’t be granted the protections of American women who are treated as kitchen and laundry room chattel. Which argument, here, would manifest itself with nothing much more than a deafening silence from the Women’s Studies Department.

Sadly, none of this anti-intellectual two-stepping is at all implausible (or even unlikely) — particularly when one is forced by one’s progressivism to navigate through the minefield that identity politics and multiculturalism combine to create once protected groups become pitted against one another.

Of course, simply by posting the video, Charles at LGF sets himself up as a convenient (and potentially diversionary) scapegoat. He will be accused of “hate” — for precisely the same reason that progressives can rationalize their refusal to publish Danish Mohammed cartoons, or Opus comic strips,\: the simple fact of airing criticism of Muslim ideologues is itself an offense against today’s Orwellian idea of “tolerance,” even in cases where the ideologues themselves produced the material being criticized.

In this case, the contortions of university logic would likely go something like this: the MSA is engaging in protected political speech, and so can confront others students, film those confrontations, and present it for consumption, even if the purpose is to recruit new ideologues for further harrassment.

However, the moment control over the context is wrested away by someone like Charles at LGF, Muslims are being unfairly targeted as objects of hate, and the criticism implicit in the re-contexualized airing of the video (on a site known for its criticism of Islamic fundamentalism) marks it as a performance of that hate, and so — insofar as such an airing can now be re-framed as “intolerant” — is no longer protected speech.

Or, to put such contortions into their most surreal formulation (inexorable, given the structure of progressive thinking): this video, shot by the MSA, is, once it is shown by someone the MSA would consider inauthentic, a hate crime against Muslims.

Which will not stand! — given that adepts of identity politics and modern progressivism proclaim themselves “intolerant of intolerance.”

Up is down. Black is white. Balki is that other guy, the short nebishy one with the curly hair.

In the service of pragmatism, one might see the university — if the proper pressure is applied — voice its displeasure over the way the MSA is conducting its activism, even as it mouths its predictable claim to champion free speech.

But those who have been paying attention — or who aren’t committed to an intentional double standard that they recognize, but that they cynically ignore — know in their guts that had this show of political speech been, say, an “affirmative action bake sale” put on by college Republicans, or an anti-gay protest put on by the Campus Crusade for Christ, concerns about free speech would be less than forthcoming.

http://proteinwisdom.com/?p=9745

Jolie Rouge
09-06-2007, 02:12 PM
'Hate' in city
By Bonnie Washuk , Staff Writer
Thursday, April 19, 2007

LEWISTON - One student has been suspended and more disciplinary action could follow a possible hate crime at Lewiston Middle School, Superintendent Leon Levesque said Wednesday.

On April 11, a white student placed a ham steak in a bag on a lunch table where Somali students were eating. Muslims consider pork unclean and offensive. The act reminded students of a man who threw a pig's head into a Lewiston mosque last summer.

The school incident is being treated seriously as "a hate incident," Levesque said. Lewiston police are investigating, and the Center for the Prevention of Hate Violence is working with the school to create a response plan. "We've got some work to do to turn this around and bring the school community back together again," Levesque said.

Placing ham where Muslim students were eating was "an awful thing," said Stephen Wessler, executive director of the Center for Prevention of Hate Violence. "It's extraordinarily hurtful and degrading" to Muslims, whose religion prohibits them from being around ham. It's important to respond swiftly, Wessler said. "Incidents like this that involve degrading language or conduct are often said by the perpetrator as a joke. I know that conduct is never static," he said. "It's part of a process of escalation."

If people think insulting Muslims with ham is OK, "More degrading acts will follow, until at some point we'll end up having violence," Wessler said.

The incident does not reflect the moral values of the school staff and students, Levesque said. "We need to take a look at this and review how a careless act is degrading and causes hurt to other people. All our students should feel welcome and safe in our schools."

He said a letter would be sent home to parents explaining what happened and outlining the school's response. Wessler will meet with students to address the school's climate, and staff will talk about how to respond to and prevent future hate incidents

'I didn't feel safe'

A 14-year-old Somali boy, whose mother asked that his name not be published, said he was eating lunch with four other Somali students on April 11. He noticed many others in the cafeteria "standing up, looking at us."

One boy came near, began laughing and threw a bag on the table while other students laughed and said, 'Good job.'"

"We didn't know what was in this bag," the boy said. "One of my friends reached inside it. It was a big ham steak. There were five of us at the table, all Somali. It was intended for us."

The boy said he looked up at students he thought were his friends. "I felt angered, offended."

He suddenly felt like he was alone. "At the school the next day, I didn't feel safe. I felt like everybody was against me. Before I felt like I fit in, and everything was normal."

He began to think white students didn't like him, and the act was their way of letting him know.

On Thursday, several students came up to him and said, "Those guys who did it were jerks. I apologize for them, and I hope you feel better."

The boy said they did make him feel better. "But for the rest of my life when I remember middle school, this will pop up right away."

He spoke out because he wants the community to know what happened, "that there is something like this going on in our schools."

Wessler and Levesque said the act happened the day before April vacation began, which prevented educators from gathering information.

"This is not done," Wessler said.

http://www.sunjournal.com/story/208385-3/LewistonAuburn/Hate_incident_in_city/


A hate crime? Doesn't there have to be an underlying crime before we can leap to "hate crime" status?

Well, thank God the CPHV is on the case whipping up a "response plan." Although, judging by their name, they are there to prevent VIOLENCE, and the last time I checked, having "placed a ham steak...on a lunch table" doesn't qualify.

But let's not forget the fact that the student with the porkalicious gift was white. The reporter made sure to include that little tidbit.

Why does that matter, I ask? If the act was perpetrated to offend someone based on their religion, why on earth do we need to know the race of the kid who did it?

Jolie Rouge
09-06-2007, 02:45 PM
September 6, 2007
Fitzgerald: College students, your every phrase is being watched

Send us your syllabus. But be careful.

Be careful, those of you who for some strange reason have decided to take a course on Islam, or subjects related to Islam (e.g., a course on anything having to do with the Middle East, or India, or Comparative Religion, or World Politics Today), and you suspect that the instructor is an apologist in one form or another. That form may be the forme fruste of the disease -- we are making Grand Rounds, for those of you who didn’t know -- and manageable, just, but it may also be the full-fledged thing. And why should you have to endure a lower grade inflicted by a vindictive Muslim or Muslim-apologist grader? You shouldn’t.

One example. A few years ago someone I know took a course at Harvard on Islam. The graders were Muslims. On the final examination, the short-answer part of the exam consisted of a list of items that needed to be identified and discussed in a few sentences. One of the items was “Muhammad’s Night Journey.” So the student explained what this was, and where it was said to have happened, and that it was called the “miraj,” and what Muhammad actually did on his fabulous winged creature al-Buraq.

But what the student did, that proved fatal to his grade on this question, and on the grades he received for the other questions, was his including the phrase “as Muslims believe” or “Muslims believe that…” When he went to complain about the entirely unjustified “C” he received on the exam -- and a failing grade on that particular question -- he was asked why he had written “as Muslims believe.” Well, he answered, they do believe it. But, asked the grader-instructor, are you implying that it isn’t true, that Muhammad did not make his Night Journey on Al-Buraq? The student was too stunned to answer. It was clear that the slightest calling into question of Muslim beliefs was going to be punished.

I urged that student to go to the President of Harvard and make a stink. He was graduating and chose not to. But he hasn’t forgotten what happened. And he told me that it has colored forever his view of Islam, and also his view of Harvard.

The moral of this story, not fable, is: Watch out. Faites attention. Ostorozhno. Your every phrase is indeed being watched, by Muslim teachers, for signs of any slight calling into question of the Received Islamic Version of Reality, and by their non-Muslim willing collaborators, for any signs of disrespect or doubt exhibited toward Islam.

Perhaps you think that despite all this, you may learn something. Yes, you will learn something, and if you come out un-indoctrinated on the other side, you may come out as the boy in the story above did, far readier and able to learn the grim truth about Islam precisely because he had been subjected to brainwashing.

The Middle East Studies Association, or MESA, or more accurately MESA Nostra, is the professional organization of teachers of Islamic and Middle Eastern studies in this country. In 1970 about 3% of its membership was Muslim; today it is about 70%.

As an organization, MESA has over the past two decades slowly but surely been taken over by apologists for Islam. Many of these are Muslims, and many are non-Muslims. The latter includes quite a few people who are married to Muslims, or who, to get along with their colleagues (and remember, the most political place in the entire universe is a university faculty, and that institution which, alas, Randall Jarrell failed to immortalize, if memory serves, the Departmental Meeting. Junior faculty owe everything to, and therefore must curry favor with, senior faculty. If that means signing an anti-divestment petition that has the mighty empire of Israel, fons et origo of everything that has ever gone wrong with the Muslim and Arab states and peoples, then so be it. Funny thing about being a trimmer, however, is that the mere act of signing something you really don't believe helps to convince you that you really do believe it. Otherwise you would have to come to terms with your own cravenness, your own pusillanimity. And no one wants to do that.

Be careful. You may land in a course taught by one of these True Believers, who will brook no dissent.

http://www.jihadwatch.org/archives/018060.php

Comments

"It was clear that the slightest calling into question of Muslim beliefs was going to be punished."

But of course Islam is just another religion to be treated equally with the many branches of Christianity, Judaism and any other faith practiced in America. There must be biblical studies courses. Had this Harvard student taken such a course and answered a question with "as Jews believe" or "as Christians believe", the ACLU couldn't jump to his aid fast enough. A lawsuit would be ongoing right now.

"It is said that Muhammad..." would probably also get a failing grade.

"It is said that Moses..." gets an A.


See Also http://affadshaikh.blogspot.com

Jolie Rouge
09-12-2007, 02:18 PM
GMU: Broadside Stands Up to Inequality
Brian C. Ledbetter
Wednesday, September 12. 2007 07:18

The George Mason University Broadside, our student newspaper, is taking a shot at actually investigating the MSA's de-facto takeover of our controversial "meditation" space. Check it out: http://www.snappedshot.com/archives/1135-George-Mason-University-Some-are-Still-More-Equal.html

http://www.snappedshot.com/uploads/Virginia/GMU/IMG00631.serendipityThump.jpg

http://www.snappedshot.com/uploads/Virginia/GMU/IMG00631.serendipityThump.jpg

Inequality 2007Controversy over the Johnson Center’s third floor meditation space has continued through the summer, following a Broadside article in the May issue that sparked an increase in debate and coverage. http://www.snappedshot.com/archives/819-Updates-are-Also-More-Equal.html [Ed.:—Be sure to see our photo essay for a firsthand account from this Fall. ]

Though the meditation space is open to use by all students, the Muslims at Mason tend to use it more than others, an issue that has garnered attention from the student population.

“A meditation area fulfills a need. Muslims, no doubt, use these areas almost exclusively, but Islam is the only religion that describes how to pray, when to pray and how many times to pray,” said Luqman Mahmood, Ahmadiyya Muslim Student Association member. “Other religions do not have such a clear teaching about prayer, which is why Muslims use these areas so much in proportion to people of other faiths.” [Ed.:—I think Christ was pretty clear about His teaching on prayer, and from what I know of Judaism, their prayer structure is fairly well-defined, too...]


Surprisingly enough, the Broadside provides concrete examples of the MSA's bullying, which you can find beyond the fold:


Incidentally: (this would be The Fold)

Some people are never happy, no matter how hard you try and please appease them:

With the new fall semester underway, George Mason University is introducing the option of halal food on campus..., a type permissible under Islamic law. (...) Now that the food has been worked into Sodexho dining however, the reaction from halal meat-eaters falls short. Suehyb Alkhatib, vice president of the MSA, said that the members of MSA who tried the food were not pleased. “The food was stale and not very flavorful,” Alkhatib said. “It was a much lower quality than the non-halal food.”

There's a rational explanation for this, Suehyb: It's a Zionist conspiracy.
And now, back to our main discussion:


“Many Jewish students have expressed interest in using the space but felt too intimidated or felt that such a move might be too provocative to follow through on,” a statement from the Hillel Student Board said. Other religious groups on campus were contacted for comment but no others had responded by deadline.

...

Joseph Sorgini, senior government and international politics major, spoke of an encounter in the meditation space when he went to go pray a rosary in March.

“I had no sooner finished “and the Holy Spirit, Amen” in my head when two men approached me and asked me to get up,” Sorgini said. “I was hesitant at first, so one of the individuals responded with the statement ‘What ever you have in your hand there, you can not use that here.’”

Sorgini was told by the men, who identified themselves as members of MSA but would not say their names, that the Space was an area designated for Muslim prayer use. He was told that he should have removed his shoes as well.

“I apologized for the confusion, but told him that I was made aware that this space was open for all religions or those who use meditation for non-religious purposes to use,” Sorgini said. “The first male, who had responded earlier about the rosary in my hand, told me that this was not true, and asked that I leave. Not wanting to find myself in the middle of an argument, I exchanged goodbyes with them, and left the area.”

...

“Mason giving priority to a single religious group, as they appear to be doing, is a violation of the law,” The Hillel Student Board said. “However, the existence of this space is not threatening, just imbalanced. Mason should be providing a spiritual space for use by its students; however, it should be one open to everyone. There are already substantial spaces on campus which could be used for religious purposes, though they can be hard to get hold of. The meditation space could also be used by all if it is treated fairly.”


I actually disagree with Hillel a touch on that last part—Mason is not doing any such thing, by "policy." Their inaction, on the other hand, is allowing the MSA to bully other students (see Joseph's story above), but that in and of itself isn't a violation of the law. (Whether the MSA should bone up and provide their own private worship space is still a point of debate, I would think.)

I received a note from Rebecca Fulton of the Broadside:


Just wanted to let you know that I recently worked on an article along side Rachael Dickson of GMU's Broadside and I found that the footbaths were installed with the building 12 years ago while the meditation space was only created 5-7 years ago.


Based on my memory, Rebecca, the bathrooms that currently have the footbaths in them were remodeled sometime around Fall 2003 or Spring 2004, when I first started attending the school. I'm wondering if these spaces were originally janitorial space or not—and am eagerly looking forward to hearing back from you, if you happen to find that out.

http://www.snappedshot.com/archives/1167-George-Mason-University-Broadside-Stands-Up-to-Inequality.html

Jolie Rouge
12-17-2007, 12:01 PM
Normandale's 'meditation room' is home to a single faith
By Katherine Kersten, Star Tribune
December 16, 2007 - 8:53 PM

Last week, I visited a Muslim place of worship. A schedule for Islam's five daily prayers was posted at the entrance, near a sign requesting that shoes be removed. Inside, a barrier divided men's and women's prayer space, an arrow informed worshippers of the direction of Mecca, and literature urged women to cover their faces.

Sound like a mosque?

The place I'm describing is the "meditation room" at Normandale Community College, a 9,200-student public institution in Bloomington.

Until recently, the room was the school's only usable racquetball court. College administrators converted the court into a meditation room when construction forced closure of the previous meditation room.

A row of chest-high barriers splits the room into sex-segregated sections. In the smaller, enclosed area for women sits a pile of shawls and head-coverings. Literature titled "Hijaab [covering] and Modesty" was prominently placed there, instructing women on proper Islamic behavior.

They should cover their faces and stay at home, it said, and their speech should not "be such that it is heard."

"Enter into Islaam completely and accept all the rulings of Islaam," the tract read in part. "It should not be that you accept what entertains your desires and leave what opposes your desires; this is from the manners of the Jews."

"[T]he Jews and the Christians" are described as "the enemies of Allaah's religion." The document adds: "Remember that you will never succeed while you follow these people."

A poster on the room's door advertised a local lecture on "marriage from an Islamic perspective," with "useful tips for marital harmony from the Prophet's ... life." Other fliers invited students to join the Normandale Islamic Forum, or participate in Ramadan celebrations.

One thing was missing from the meditation room: evidence of any faith but Islam. No Bible, no crucifix, no Torah.

Normandale's administration is facilitating the room's Islamization. The college's building crew erected the barrier separating men's and women's sections, according to Ralph Anderson, dean of student affairs. College officials also posted signs at the room's entrance asking students to remove shoes -- a Muslim custom before prayers. This was "basically a courtesy to Muslim students," Anderson said.

Despite the room's Islamic atmosphere, Anderson says it "is open to everyone."

Why is the meditation room segregated by sex? "Muslim students prefer that areas be divided into male and female," he said. "Other students don't care."

Doesn't sex-segregation present a constitutional problem in a public educational institution? "I don't want to comment on that," he said.

And the literature regarding Jews and Christians? "I would probably take it out if I knew it was in there," said Anderson.

Normandale's zealous effort to accommodate Muslim students is not new. Chad Lunaas, a former student who works at the college part time, cites examples.

Last year on Fridays, he says, he often entered the bathroom to find that "every sink and toilet stall had someone washing his feet." Other students couldn't use the bathroom at these times, and those who tried felt awkward.

Lunaas finally expressed his concerns to a Muslim student who "seemed to be in charge."

"His attitude was, 'We don't have to listen to you, we can do whatever we want,' " he said.

Confrontations also erupted in the sex-segregated meditation room, according to Lunaas. "Muslim students just took it over. They made people who were not of the Muslim religion feel very uncomfortable, especially if they were female."

One female student tried to use the room when Muslim students were in it, said Lunaas. "She believed she should be treated equally. They were telling her to leave, to take off her shoes, to go to the other side of the divider."

Anderson says he met several times with concerned students. But "the whole thing was just basically swept aside," according to Lunaas.

Anderson said that in the incident involving the young woman, "both sides were probably out of line."

Howard Odor, who advises the college's Somali Student Association, said he has not been aware of "any issues" since the meditation room has been in the racquetball court. "I can guarantee that college policy is that anyone who wants to go in there and pray or meditate can do so."

But many at the college see a bigger issue. "For all practical purposes, this meditation room is essentially a Muslim prayer room," said Chuck Chalberg of Normandale's history faculty. "Something this unprecedented goes beyond religious toleration."

Katherine Kersten • kkersten@startribune.com Join the conversation at my blog, Think Again, which can be found at www.startribune.com/thinkagain.

http://www.startribune.com/featuredColumns/12551256.html



One female student tried to use the room when Muslim students were in it, said Lunaas. "She believed she should be treated equally. They were telling her to leave, to take off her shoes, to go to the other side of the divider."
....
Anderson said that in the incident involving the young woman, "both sides were probably out of line."


I mean ... HOW DARE SHE ! Why should she think that a non-denomitational meditation room should be open to ALL students of the school regardless of gender or faith ??